UK: Muslim peer warns of “sharp increase in polygamy”

Idaho lawmakers reject sexual orientation discrimination bill

Florida: Destin to revisit sexually oriented business law

William Saletan: “A culture of life requires an ethic of contraception”

    Conservatives, in turn, need to face the corollary truth: A culture of life requires an ethic of contraception. Birth control isn’t a sin or an offense against life, as so many girls and Catholic couples have been taught. It’s a loving, conscientious way to prevent the conception of a child you can’t bear to raise and don’t want to abort. It’s an act of responsibility and respect for life.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.nytimes.com

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U.S. Supreme Court refuses to hear challenge to policy barring student from speaking against homosexual behavior

Maggie Gallagher: Trading Civil Unions for Religous-Liberty Protection?

NY: Strip club sign stirs new conflict between town, operator

Florida: 18 year old stripper missing after leaving club

Memphis Man Pleads Guilty to Federal Sex Trafficking Charges

Virginia: Sex investigations uncover tales of suffering

Virginia Senate Kills Prayer ‘In Jesus Name’

“Barney Frank Online Gambling Bill May Reveal Republican Future”

California: “Marriage ruling gave gay people legal protection”

R.I. legislators to take up annual marriage debate

Child prostitutes rescued in US 29 cities

Georgia: Sex shop owners say new law would hurt

Excluding religion excludes more than religion

    This Article contends that excluding apparently religious perspectives from public debate may inadvertently exclude non-religious perspectives as well, consequently impoverishing public discussion. This contention is demonstrated through an examination of the current debate over embryonic stem cell research, in which the pro-life position is often declared unacceptably religious. The truth is that those who envision the unborn as under construction in the womb do not find a human being present when gestation has just begun, while those who understand the unborn to be developing see an identity of being from conception. But neither view is based on religion. To disqualify the pro-life view as religious would exclude from public debate an important secular perspective.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: mirrorofjustice.blogs.com

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WV: “Gay, lesbians fight for civil protections”

Colo. Senate gives initial OK to same-sex benefits

FRC Policy Lecture: Why isn’t anyone telling our kids about the other dangers of casual sex?

Judge orders restitution for porn victim

Florida Prosecutor Continues to Stonewall on Criminal Charges in Hialeah Baby Murder Case

    LifeSiteNews: “Ignoring a letter signed by 44 members of the State House of Representatives Friday, Florida State Attorney Katherine Rundle issued a statement indicating that no decision has been made on the filing of criminal charges against abortionist Pierre Renelique …


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.lifesitenews.com

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Arkansas Enshrines Partial-Birth Abortion Ban into State Law

Is The Endorsement Test Up for Grabs in New Supreme Court Case?

Montana Senate OKs Amdt Limiting Privacy Clause on Abortion, Goes to House

    LifeNews: “The Montana Senate on Thursday approved legislation that would limit the misuse of the privacy clause in the state constitution to allow for unlimited abortions. Montana is one of a handful of states where the state Supreme Court has …


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.lifenews.com

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Alabama: Vote taken to change fidelity and chastity clause for Presbyterian clergy

Montana: Plaintiff attys win fees in assisted suicide case

“Washington State Says Religious Group Can Refuse Gay Volunteers”

Justice Department Settles RLUIPA/ Housing Suit With Nashville, TN

Alan Sears: “Welcome to ‘Fantasy Island’ – ACLU Style”

David Blankenhorn and Jonathan Rauch: “A Reconciliation on Gay Marriage”

Legal Experts Propose Limiting Justices’ Powers, Terms

Hawaii May Become Fifth State to Legalize Civil Unions

UK: “Parents told: avoid morality in sex lessons”

Time Magazine’s False Report on FOCA

Supreme Court to tackle judicial conflict of interest

U.S. Supreme Court will hear dispute over 8-foot cross

ADF attorneys appeal ruling against student groups at San Diego State University

Georgetown Law: “Webcast — Same Sex Marriage and Religious Liberty”

Wiscosin: “Critics: domestic partner benefits unconstitutional”

Soros sees no bottom for world financial “collapse”

    Reuters: “Renowned investor George Soros said on Friday the world financial system has effectively disintegrated, adding that there is yet no prospect of a near-term resolution to the crisis . . . “


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.reuters.com

6th Circuit Upholds Porn Law Protecting Children

China: “Hillary pleas with communists to keep buying treasury bonds”

    AFP: US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Sunday urged China to keep buying US debt as she wrapped up her first overseas trip, during which she agreed to work closely with Beijing on the financial crisis. Clinton made the plea …


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Global
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  • Source: www.breitbart.com

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Satanist inmate sues county

A Man Who Thinks Child Porn is Free Speech Is Not Fit for Justice

“Bunning: Justice Ginsburg likely will be dead in 9 months”

Accommodating Niqab-Wearing Women in Courtrooms

    Muslim women who wear the hijab have for some time borne the brunt of public and institutional opposition to their religious dress. Of late, Muslim women who wear the niqab, or the full-face veil, have also found themselves to be the targets of arbitrary governmental policies and public objection. This chapter is an attempt to analyze opposition to the niqab in courtroom settings. It is argued that permitting women to wear the niqab in courtrooms does not impede justice. Opposition to the niqab is usually a knee-jerk response to difference that is typically not grounded in any rational understanding of the actual circumstances at issue. Part I of this chapter scrutinizes judicial assessment of credibility based on demeanour evidence, suggesting that demeanour is an inherently unreliable tool by which to judge truthfulness. The author argues that accommodations ought to be available to niqab-wearing women in their potentially multiple roles as lawyer, witness, jury member, judge or accused. Part II of the chapter suggests accommodation measures for niqab-wearing women in the few instances in which seeing their faces is necessary for the judicial task at hand. The illustrations in this chapter are drawn primarily from cases in Canada with some examples from Britain, the United States and New Zealand.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Are Secularism and Neutrality Attractive to Religious Minorities?

Marriage, Equality and Subsidizing Families in Liberal Public Justification: Is There a Right to Polygamy?

    This essay argues that the four most plausible arguments compatible with public reason for an outright legal ban on all forms of polygamy are unvictorious. My purpose is not to survey exhaustively the empirical literature on contemporary forms of polygamy, but to tease out the types of arguments political liberals would have to insist on, and precisely how strongly, in order for a general prohibition against polygamy to be justified. The most common objection to polygamy is on grounds of gender equality, more specifically, female equality. But advancing this argument forcefully often involves neglecting the tendency of political liberalism (whatever name it goes by in contemporary, complex, multicultural societies) to tolerate a certain amount of inegalitarianism in private, within the bounds of robust and meaningful freedoms of choice and exit. Properly understood, polygamy involves no inherent statement about the essential inferiority of women, and certainly not more than many other existing practices and institutions (including many expressions of the main monotheistic religions) which political liberals regard as tolerable.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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How Sexual Predators in (Your)Space Have Strategically Employed Existing Cyber-Laws to Outflank Their Prey

    With the modern landscape of tech-savvy youths, today’s sexual predators employ online social networking sites (“OSNs”) as the new frontier for clandestine hunting grounds. These faceless cyber-sharks–the illicit spawn of the robust shelters created by § 230 of the Communications Decency Act (“CDA”)–have rapidly adapted to the free reign enjoyed in the unbridled habitat that is the internet. This Comment examines the surprisingly expansive immunity currently afforded to OSNs under the guise of the CDA. It also endorses the policies of website accountability and online sex-offender registration as complimentary techniques of combating today’s online predator crisis. Lastly, it serves to meet a growing need for the assemblage of cyber-law related information into an organized legal paper that explains several emerging concepts of liability for interactive internet service providers.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

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Chaos, Law, and God: The Religious Meanings of Homosexuality

    In fact, NCR leaders are perhaps more right than they know, because liberated sexuality (especially, and symbolically, homosexuality) is indeed a threat to the mythic nomos of religion as they understand it. Part III rejects the claim that debates about homosexuality are merely about homophobia or the simplistic dichotomy of “church and state.” Rather, when viewed with a more rigorous analytical framework (Part III utilizes the developmental models of theorist Ken Wilber, drawing on the work of Robert Kegan, Lawrence Kohlberg, Susann Cook-Greuter, and others), liberated homosexuality represents a change in the meaning of religion itself, a moving from what Wilber and others call a “mythic” understanding of religion to a “post-mythic” one.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: works.bepress.com

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A Proposal for Elevating the Status of Marriage By Narrowing Its Definition

    This article proposes an approach that defines two legally recognized relationships. First, opposite-sex couples desiring a traditional marriage could choose the option that generally adopts portions of the covenant marriage law enacted thus far by three states. Second, all couples, whether same-sex or opposite-sex, could choose the option most similar to today’s current marriage relationship.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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Rethinking Visitation: From a Parental to a Relational Right

    Visitation with children has been in the public and legal limelight for several decades. Despite the enormous interest evoked by this issue and the extensive concern with this right, confusion and dissatisfaction with existing legal rules surrounding visitation has only intensified. This article argues that the perplexity surrounding this issue reflects the absence of an underlying theory of visitation that would specify the interests and values that a right to visitation should aim to protect. It is further argued that the current perception of visitation rights as parental rights and the attempts to resolve the dilemmas prompted by visitation within a parental rights context thwart the development of a theory of visitation. The article proposes an alternative perspective on these dilemmas that challenges the fundamental premise of visitation as a parental right and as an integral component of the rights cluster associated with parental status. Instead, it is suggested to understand the right to visitation as independent of the cluster of rights associated with parental status and based on relational values.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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De-Regulating and De-Criminalizing Innovations in Human Reproduction

    Deciding to create a new human being as a member of one’s family may be as quintessential an aspect of personal liberties implied in the Constitution as the right to privacy. Prior decisions by the Supreme Court about contraception, informed consent, and abortion, among many other decisions, imply a respect for an area where governments should not interfere with individuals’ decisions concerning the creation of families.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life

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Separate and Invisible: Alternative Education Programs and Our Educational Rights

    This Note argues that many disciplinary alternative education programs (“AEPs”) violate both parents’ fundamental right to control their child’s education and students’ as yet unrecognized fundamental right to receive a minimally adequate education. These programs infringe parents’ fundamental right to guide their child’s upbringing by removing both the child and the child’s school from standards-based assessments, which confounds parents’ ability to compare their child’s education with their own values and to take action on the basis of that comparison. In addition, this Note argues that the right to receive a minimally adequate education is a longstanding tradition in America that has become increasingly essential to our ordered liberty along with the expansion of suffrage over the last century. AEPs often violate this right because they are unaligned with state education standards and do not offer an opportunity to earn a diploma. As part of its conclusions, this Note identifies solutions that, unlike the current model of AEPs, are narrowly tailored to achieve the state’s compelling interests in school discipline and in combating students’ disengagement from school.


  • Posted: 02/23/2009
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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Words to Live By: Public Health, The First Amendment, and Government Speech