Va. Senate OKs bill against health reform mandate

Earth religions get worship area at AF Academy

Idaho pastor defends church members held in Haiti

Muslim advocates decry California councilwoman’s Facebook posting over murder trial

Video: Geert Wilders opening words in court

New Study Shows Abstinence Education is Most Effective

After the Sparks, Erotic Adult Shop’s Open for Business

    MSNBC: “People were blushing and burning up with anger in Southington over the opening of an adult boutique, but as of Monday, the shop is open for business. Despite protests from residents, V.I.P. — Very Intimate Pleasures — opened its doors on Queen Street in Southington on Monday morning . . . The chain is trying to open another store in Berlin but they are gearing up for a fight. Last week, a federal appeals court upheld a key part of Berlin’s sexually orientated business ordinance . . . ”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.nbcconnecticut.com

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Utah: Two abortion bills advance in legislature

    KCPW: “A bill aimed at giving women who seek an abortion the choice to see an ultrasound of their unborn child first cleared the House Health and Human Services Committee on Friday . . . Another anti-abortion proposal sponsored by Wimmer passed on the floor of the Utah House of Representatives Friday by a 59-to-12 vote. It makes it a criminal homicide for a woman to have an illegal abortion. That bill now heads to the Senate for consideration.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: kcpw.org

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Hijacking the Brain — How Pornography Works

    AlbertMohler.com: “Struthers is a psychologist with a background in neuroscience and a teaching concentration in the biological bases of human behavior. In Wired for Intimacy: How Pornography Hijacks the Male Brain, Struthers presents key insights from neuroscience that go a long way toward explaining why pornography is such a temptation for the male mind.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.albertmohler.com

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“German homeschoolers’ political asylum in America exposes the EU Gulag”

Book Review: A collision of church and state

    Wall Street Journal: “Two monuments in Paris are so prominent that they’re hard to miss. One is the Eiffel Tower, of course, the all-iron tour de force of engineering, standing by the Seine amid the city’s spacious and supremely elegant West End. Then to the north, atop Montmartre, there is the Sacré-Cœur: a tall, immaculately white Catholic basilica that looks like a digitized pre-Raphaelite set from ‘Lord of the Rings.’ What most visitors—and in fact most Parisians— don’t realize is that both monuments were designed and their construction begun at about the same time, in the 1870s and 1880s. Even more surprising: The tower and the church were intended as antagonistic national symbols during times of cultural, religious and political conflict that roiled France for decades.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: online.wsj.com

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“Pope condemns gay equality laws ahead of first UK visit”

Utah Dems shelve “gay-rights” bills for a year

Iran’s judiciary chief refuses to speed executions

La. senator to stop blocking Obama nominees

Mexico: Same-sex “marriage” unconstitutional, says legal expert

RNC resolution concerning party support of candidates

Jordan Lorence on WABC’s “Religion on the Line”: 15 years of litigation so churches can rent NYC public school facilities on Sunday morning

Australian Opposition leader blasted for suggesting girls save sex for marriage

Judge Gives Miller 30 Days to Transfer Daughter to Former Lesbian Lover or Face Arrest

Calif. Quietly Shifts Fruitless Embryo Research Funds to Adult Stem Cells

Turkmenistan: Worship without state registration “illegal”

Belarus: Conscientious objector jailed

Westlaw, LexisNexis Debut Revamped Research Tools at LegalTech New York

    Sean Doherty writes at Law.com: “Online legal research is not an easy activity. An entire industry has grown up around interpreting research needs and finding information for lawyers and their clients . . . Last year, Google Scholar and Public.Resource.Org made legal information more available and easier to search. This year at LegalTech New York, LexisNexis and Thomson Reuters aim to change the way users interface legal research tasks. And these changes, at once, appear to make legal research easier and more effective . . . ”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.law.com

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Sign a petition, disclose your name?

Rifqa Bary’s Parents Seek to Withdraw Settlement Consent Entered Last Week

The pro-life assault on Ron Paul and the Constitution

    Laurence M. Vance writing at LewRockwell.com: “According to most pro-lifers, the solution to the abortion problem is not persuasion, education, or counseling; it is more centralization of power in the federal government – the same government that, in a vast power grab that did violence to the Constitution, asserted federal supremacy over the states’ abortion laws in the Roe v. Wade decision . . . Dr. Paul’s first step in eradicating the plague of abortion from America is a simple one: remove the jurisdiction of the federal courts and the Supreme Court, as the Constitution allows in Article III . . . After jurisdiction over abortion is returned to the states, pro-lifers can then begin a state-by-state campaign to criminalize abortion.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.lewrockwell.com

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Common-Law Marriage: A Nineteenth-Century Relic with Continuing Relevance

    Joanna L. Grossman writes at Findlaw: “But despite its radical drop in popularity over the course of this century, common-law marriage should not be forgotten. It is a device that still functions as an alternative way to form a marriage – or to claim with hindsight that one was formed in the past. And given the legal significance of marital status, as the determinant of a wide variety of rights and obligations, we forget about common-law marriage at our peril.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: writ.lp.findlaw.com

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Indian Supreme Court Says Civil Service Rules Trump Muslim Personal Law

Religious centrists bail on Obama

    Lisa Miller writing in Newsweek: “Count the moderate faithful, then, among those palpably disappointed in the president. Part of this is inevitable, the bruising differential between courtship and marriage. But part of it is a legitimate frustration that the thing Obama once did so well—articulate American values as a matter of conscience and community—he seems today not to be able to do at all.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.newsweek.com

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Reengineering the family: Severing biology from parenthood

The right to live

“England is a cesspit”

Mike Adams: Mosque University

Religious beliefs targeted in Proposition 8

Forsyth County, NC: Prayer “a losing cause”

New York Times Defends Pro-Life Ad Featuring Tim Tebow, Mom’s Non-Abortion

It’s hard to keep Jesus out of a prayer

South Dakota argues “self-evident truths”

At heart of Prop. 8 trial, a fight over nurturing kids

Documents raise spectre of fetal harvesting in WU late-term abortion scheme

Federal bill would impose “gay agenda” on local schools

In Coke We Trust

Anti-abortion campaigner Veronica Connolly launches licence fee test case against BBC

Tenn. School Board OKs Bible Study Guidelines

Christians threatened with arrest in Richmond for sharing Gospel, lawsuit filed

Video: “Same-Sex Marriage Case: The Post-Mortem”

Supply teacher sacked for offering prayer able to return to work

New Northern Ireland pact elusive, dashing premiers’ hopes

Law Review: No Respect: Brian Leiter on Religion

    Andrew M.M. Koppelman, No Respect: Brian Leiter on Religion (January 5, 2010). Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 10-07. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1544484

    “In two recent papers, Brian Leiter argues that there is no good reason for law to single out religion for special treatment, and that religion is not an apt candidate for respect in the “thick” sense of being an object of favorable appraisal. Both arguments depend on a radically impoverished conception of what religion is and what it does. In this paper, I explain what Leiter leaves out, and offer an hypothesis about why. I also engage with some related reflections by Simon Blackburn and Timothy Macklem, both of whom influence, in different ways, Leiter’s analysis.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Death of the Inconvenient Other

    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Death of the Inconvenient Other
    Jonathan Penn, 11 Marq. Elder’s Advisor 165 (2009)

    “While Switzerland has enlarged suicide tourism by legalizing physician-assisted suicide, the United States has not readily accepted physician-assisted suicide at the federal level. This article looks at end-of-life issues, focusing on physician-assisted suicide, and whether the federal government’s numerous responsibilities created by the Older Americans Act and other similar acts, the government’s financial limitations, and a growing elderly population will lead to a deterioration of society’s view of elders and a legitimization and acceptance of assisted suicide.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life

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Law Review: Reproductive Rights in the Legal Academy: A New Role for Transnational Law

    Reproductive Rights in the Legal Academy: A New Role for Transnational Law
    Martha F. Davis and Bethany Withers, 59 J. Legal Educ. 35 (2009)

    “In sum, expanding reproductive rights pedagogy to address transnational perspectives will aid in exposing a wide range of students to transnational material, will contribute directly to the transnational project to expand students’ preparedness to analyze such materials, and will better reflect the debates on sexual and reproductive health currently taking place outside of law school classrooms–in the courts, among policymakers, and in scholarly writing. Below, we explore in greater detail the current status of reproductive rights teaching, the current casebook treatment of reproductive rights, and the specific ways in which transnational perspectives might be introduced to this material in a range of courses.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life

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Law Review: Informed Consent Laws and the Constitution

    Informed Consent Laws and the Constitution: Balancing State Interests with a Physician’s First Amendment Rights and a Woman’s Due Process Rights
    Sarah Runels, 26 J. Contemp. Health L. & Pol’y 185 (2009)

    “Part I of this Note outlines the existence and use of the heightened informed consent requirements. In addition, this section discusses the failure of courts and advocates on both sides of the issue to fully address the extent to which these requirements implicate physicians’ and women’s rights. Part II summarizes existing case law on informed consent provisions and advocates for a more comprehensive framework challenging the constitutionality of informed consent provisions. This framework includes a legal analysis that takes both the woman’s due process rights and the physician’s First Amendment rights into consideration. Part III analyzes the recent Eighth Circuit decision in Planned Parenthood v. Rounds. Finally, Part IV of this Note will apply the framework developed in Part II to the Eighth Circuit decision in Rounds.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty

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Law Review: Conscience and the Common Good

    Robert K. Vischer, Conscience and the Common Good (2010). Journal of Catholic Legal Studies, 2010; U of St. Thomas Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-02. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1544084

    “Our longstanding commitment to the liberty of conscience has become strained by our increasingly muddled understanding of what conscience is and why we value it. Too often we equate conscience with individual autonomy, and so we reflexively favor the individual in any contest against group authority, losing sight of the fact that a vibrant liberty of conscience requires a vibrant marketplace of morally distinct groups. Defending individual autonomy is not the same as defending the liberty of conscience because, while conscience is inescapably personal, it is also inescapably relational. Conscience is formed, articulated, and lived out through relationships, and its viability depends on the law’s willingness to protect the associations and venues through which individual consciences can flourish: these are the myriad institutions that make up the space between the person and the state. This essay is taken from my new book, Conscience and the Common Good: Reclaiming the Space Between Person and State (Cambridge Univ. Press 2010). The book seeks to reframe the debate about conscience by bringing its relational dimension into focus.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: The New American Civil Religion: Lesson for Italy

    Andrew M.M. Koppelman, The New American Civil Religion: Lesson for Italy (January 29, 2010). George Washington International Law Review, Forthcoming; Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 10-05. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1544465

    “American civil religion has been changing, responding to increasing religious plurality by becoming more abstract. The problem of increasing plurality is not only an American one. It is also presented in Italy, where civic identity has been centered around a Catholicism that is no longer universal. Perhaps Italy has, in this respect, an American future.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Whom Should a Catholic Law School Honor?

    Robert K. Vischer, Whom Should a Catholic Law School Honor?: If Confusion is the Concern, Context Matters (2010). Journal of Catholic Legal Studies, 2010; U of St. Thomas Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-05. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1544095

    “If a Catholic can vote for a pro-choice candidate when proportionate reasons justify that decision, can a Catholic law school honor a pro-choice public figure if there are proportionate reasons to do so? In other words, should the law school’s inquiry focus simply on whether the honoree defies Church teaching on any matter of grave moral importance, or should the law school also consider the message communicated by the honor in light of the broader context in which it would be extended? This short essay suggests that a contextual approach is more consistent with the U.S. Bishops’ instruction on this matter and avoids some of the collateral harm arising from a bright-line prohibition on honoring anyone who defies even a single aspect of Church teaching.”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Why Should a Catholic Law School Be Catholic?

    Thomas M. Mengler, Why Should a Catholic Law School Be Catholic? (2010). Journal of Catholic Social Thought, Vol. 6, 2010; U of St. Thomas Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-03. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1544093

    “This article takes a more fundamental approach, by asking a different question: Why should a Catholic law school be Catholic? Two reasons, which are truly distinctive to Catholic higher education, emerge: first, the integration of faith perspectives, especially Catholic intellectual and social thought, in faculty scholarship and throughout the law school curriculum; and, second, a pervasive commitment to the moral and spiritual formation of the young adults who make up the law school student population. The Catholic law school, grounded in a rich intellectual, ethical, and spiritual formation, seeks to prepare its students for purposeful lives as lawyers and to assist them in their life journeys from what Pope Benedict XVI calls the ‘I’ to ‘We.’”


  • Posted: 02/01/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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