Pakistani Christians reject revision to proposal in blasphemy law

Coalition seeks repeal of Klan-era ban on religious garb in Oregon schools

German cultural appeasement

Cities, churches tussle over landmark status

Planned Parenthood pushes intensive sex education for kids as young as 10

Lao officials force Christians from worship at gunpoint

Sikh “ceremonial daggers” should be allowed in schools, says judge

“FCC instructor teaching anti-gay views,” ACLU says

ADF, Stand4MarriageDC appeal decision to redefine marriage without voter approval

Liberty Counsel Files to Protect the Legal Rights of Personhood in Mississippi

Va. delegate hopes to repeal same-sex “marriage” ban

U.S. House Rep. John Murtha dies at 77 (D-Penn.)

NRO Symposium on Geert Wilders: Western Civilization on trial

Candidates for RI gov promise “gay marriage” support

“Advocates push abortion-rights license plate in Va.”

Church in Costa Rica stripped of right to approve religion teachers

UK: Parliament’s Equality Bill

The EU’s horrible honeymoon

    Brussels Journal: “At this point Europe is not even halfway its 100-day political ‘honeymoon’ since the Treaty of Lisbon, which transformed the EU into a state in its own right, came into force. So far the honeymoon has been a nightmare. Since the beginning of the year, the EU’s currency, the euro, is on the brink of collapse; Greece has been placed under EU financial supervision to prevent it from going bankrupt. Now U.S. President Barack Obama has announced that he will not attend next May’s EU summit in Madrid. It was to have been Obama’s first visit to post-Lisbon Europe – the consecration of the new political order.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Global: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.brusselsjournal.com

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Democrats Divide on Voice of Possible Top-Court Pick

Harry Reid ready to play at recess

    Politico: “Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid used to consider recess appointments “an end run around the Senate and the Constitution” — so much so that he kept the chamber open during breaks to prevent President George W. Bush from making any more of them. But with a Democrat in the White House, and Republicans blocking executive branch nominees, Reid and his allies are starting to sing a different tune . . . ”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.politico.com

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Indian Court Strikes Down Quotas for Backward Classes of Muslims

White House Faith Based Council Posts Votes On Two Controversial Church-State Issues

Prop. 8 trial wraps up, leaving some Christians wondering if their votes counted

New CA bill protects pastors, could legalize “homosexual marriage”

Street preachers challenge “loud noise” and trespass bans

Lawsuit challenges library’s meeting room policy

Egyptian Christians call for right to build churches

Prop. 8 trial stirs questions, emotions

NC: Invocations at meetings disputed

Kathryn Jean Lopez: Losing our religion

Abortion revelation amps pro-life protest

Forsyth County board won’t resist court

“Iowans rate drivers’ texting as more urgent than gay marriage”

German homeschoolers granted asylum in U.S.

Freedom to pray should not be hindered, limited

    Steve Corts writes at the Winston-Salem Journal: “The freedom to practice faith (in public and private) according to one’s own conscience, without fear of government favoritism or interference, is a national treasure kept in the First Amendment. For most of American history, this has included the freedom to pray publicly and uncensored before government assemblies. Until now. The ACLU has made a relatively new discovery that this practice is unconstitutional . . . This bullying works much of the time. When threatened, many cave quickly. But not all. To date, Forsyth County has not. It shouldn’t. The ACLU is not invincible and freedom is still invaluable.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www2.journalnow.com

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Judge in Prop. 8 litigation is “gay”?

Maryland: Pressing for changes to charter school law

Innocent-sounding Calif. bill could help legalize “gay marriage,” some say

Dem. lieutenant governor candidate exits Ill. race

Nigerian Christians count dead after Jos violence

Muslim man wins handshake case in Sweden

Broad support for Christian student group reflected in numerous briefs filed with Supreme Court

Law Review: Taking Sides on Genetic Modification

    Dov Fox, Taking Sides on Genetic Modification (January 31, 2010). American Journal of Bioethics – Neuroscience, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1545513

    “Should government fund safe human enhancements for the hereditary contribution to good looks or athletic prowess or IQ? Is there reason to restrict genetic interventions that would create chickens without the nesting instincts that agitate normal chickens confined to life in a battery cage? Or cows with stunted emotions that would feel less fear as they were led off to slaughter? Or pigs with no legs, better suited to a sedentary existence as bacon-to-be? Some philosophers argue that political decisions about such practices, to be legitimate, must be made without reference to reasons that arise from within controversial worldviews. They believe that society is arranged best when governed by principles that leave citizens free to pursue their own views about what gives life value. So the reasons that public officials give to justify state action must not privilege some moral or religious beliefs over others.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: An Effort to Articulate a Catholic Realist Approach to Abortion

    Susan J. Stabile, An Effort to Articulate a Catholic Realist Approach to Abortion (2010). U of St. Thomas Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-08. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1548708

    “In an effort to try to move the abortion debate forward by trying to find common ground between very polarized positions, the Article explores what options exist for a political and legal system’s treatment of abortion that might be consistent with a Catholic realist approach. The article begins by identifying three conditions that are required for a position to be labeled a Catholic realist position: factual accuracy, viability and consistency with Catholic moral teaching. It then explores five questions as a means of articulating what a Catholic realist approach to abortion might look like, including the question whether there is a dignity interest in a woman not being forced to carry a pregnancy to term and the extent to which broad societal consensus about the moral status of abortion might impact our views of the role of law in addressing abortion.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: The Endorsement Test after Summum

    Mary Jean Dolan, Government Identity Messages and Religion: The Endorsement Test after Summum (February 5, 2010). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1548761

    “This Article offers an in-depth analysis of the opinions in Pleasant Grove v. Summum. It explores the distinctions between the ‘government speech doctrine’ – which operates as a defense to a Free Speech Clause claim – and ‘government speech’ as it has been used in Establishment Clause cases. It serves a valuable function by addressing concerns that the decision has eliminated the Establishment Clause endorsement test, or that it dangerously allows government to convert any and all private speech to its own, thus deflecting free speech claims. My interpretation shows that the Summum decision is multi-faceted and contextual; it relies on government’s expressive intent, an inherently communicative medium, and viewers’ reasonable attributions regarding monument speech. Justice Alito’s exposition on the unfettered indeterminacy of monuments’ content is either misunderstood or renders his opinion internally inconsistent.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: What Religious Freedom Jurisprudence Reveals About Equality

    Carissima Mathen, What Religious Freedom Jurisprudence Reveals About Equality (2009). Journal of Law and Equality, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1545958

    “In this article I compare jurisprudence arising under the religious freedom and the equality provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. I suggest that religious freedom jurisprudence is actually more consonant with equality ideals . . . I first argue that, while Canada’s approach to its constitutional equality guarantees has much to laud, establishing an equality rights claim has become increasingly complex, beset by multi-part tests and providing numerous opportunities for the state to justify discrimination. Then, I show how religious freedom jurisprudence has developed quite differently, invoking powerful purposive descriptions of the right; a clear focus on the individual; a clear recognition and respect for difference; and an expectation of compelling state justification.”


  • Posted: 02/08/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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