Christian woman sentenced to death in Pakistan ‘for blasphemy’

How an Iraqi Christian school became 82 percent Muslim

Abortionist inappropriately appointed to RI Governor-elect’s transition team

China and Germany slam U.S. policy before G20 summit

Methodists sue Eastern Oregon congregation over finances

Once a safe bet, repeal of DADT now in doubt

Study: Muslim women uncomfortable with U.S. doctors

U.S. backs religious freedom in Iraq

FL: Having a Republican governor and Legislature is no guarantee of harmony

French company’s plan to tag new babies causes outcry

Obama: Outreach to Muslim world has been “earnest and sustained”

With pending retirement, D.C. Appeals Court seeks new judge

Gallup’s annual Values and Beliefs Survey shows Americans remain divided on major issues

Are a small number of immigrant wives faking domestic abuse to stay in the country?

Law Review: A Proposal for a Federal Emergency Vaccination Law

    Balancing Public Health and Individual Choice: A Proposal for a Federal Emergency Vaccination Law
    Sara Mahmoud-Davis, 20 Health Matrix 219 (2010)

    “Part I discusses the relationship between vaccinations and informed consent, including exemptions. Part II examines the scientific foundation for compulsory vaccination law and looks at the inherent tension between immunization exemptions and the public health. Part III establishes the constitutional basis for permitting religious exemptions and conditional rights of refusal, while excluding philosophical opt-outs. Part IV presents arguments in favor of a federal emergency vaccination law and proposes amending the Federal Public Health Service Act. Finally, Part V explains how the mass vaccination clinics would operate and describes the informed consent and opt-out process.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty

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IN: Social issues could divide Republicans in General Assembly

Hillary Clinton: An end to human trafficking

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton: “The estimates vary widely, but it is likely that somewhere between 12 million and 27 million human beings are suffering in bondage around the world. Men, women and children are trapped in prostitution or labor in fields and factories under brutal bosses who threaten them with violence or jail if they try to escape . . . We need to redouble our efforts to fight modern slavery. I hope that the countries that have not yet acceded to the U.N. Trafficking Protocol will do so. Many other countries can still do more to strengthen their anti-trafficking laws. And all governments can devote more resources to finding victims and punishing human traffickers.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Global: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.state.gov

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Assisted suicide for couples promoted in Switzerland

“Euthanasia” by other names rife in Turkey, experts say

ACLU: UN Human Rights Council issues recommendations to U.S.

KY: Lexington to become third-largest U.S. city with an “openly-gay” mayor

Dem leadership race turns bitter as Clyburn, Hoyer exchange barbs

Catholic League: UN anti-blasphemy resolution is flawed

Ed Whelan on the TRO barring Oklahoma’s sharia law amendment

UK: “The Times insists all media should promote gay agenda”

Can parents steer their children’s sexual orientation?

Study: Law schools overwhelmingly hire liberals as law professors

Mich. school district ending Bible distribution program at elementary school

Norway: Arctic mosque plan on ice over Saudi funding

IL: Parents voice concerns about religious holiday policy

    TribLocal Hinsdale: “An amendment adopted to the calendar policy in March requires the district to avoid scheduling events and activities for days or times that would create a foreseeable religious conflict. Because of the policy, the district’s two middle school cross-country teams were not able to participate in Hinsdale High School District 86’s invitational meet Sept. 8, which fell on the eve of Rosh Hashanah. The teams also did not participate in Indian Trail Middle School’s Sept. 17 meet because it fell on the eve of Yom Kippur.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: triblocal.com

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NC pastor found guilty of stalking abortion doctors

KY: Mayfield mosque gets permission to operate

UK: Schools get go-ahead to teach Paganism alongside major religions

MN: Maplewood passes domestic partnership ordinance

Iowa: Senate GOP leader pushes for vote on marriage

UK: Cafe fan banned in case smell of bacon offends Muslims

De facto sharia law in America

    Janet Levy writing at American Thinker: “Is the United States today a de facto shariah state? A close look at recent events points to some alarming conclusions about the tenets of shariah law taking hold in our once-proud constitutional republic and the unwitting, unequal application of existing U.S. laws. The result is that when it comes to religious expression, Muslims now enjoy more freedom of religion and speech under our Bill of Rights than non-Muslims. Equal protection under the laws of our country holds for Muslims far better than for non-Muslims. Several recent examples illustrate this point.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.americanthinker.com

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Alan Sears: Special interest group to Christians: Be careful what you ask for

Revenge of the culture wars

    David N. Bass writing at The American Spectator: “After mostly lying dormant for two elections cycle, will the culture wars make a comeback in 2012? There’s a more than even chance of it. One reason is that marriage amendments will be on the ballot in at least a handful of states that have stonewalled the issue for years. That’s due to historic Republican gains in governorships and state legislatures around the country, often in areas where the GOP hasn’t held the reins of power in decades, even centuries.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: spectator.org

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Charles Taylor: The meaning of secularism

    The Meaning of Secularism
    Charles Taylor, The Hedgehog Review 12.3 (Fall 2010)

    “One of our basic difficulties in dealing with these problems is that we have the wrong model, which has a continuing hold on our minds. We think that secularism (or laïcité) has to do with the relation of the state and religion, whereas in fact it has to do with the (correct) response of the democratic state to diversity. If we look at the three goals above, they have in common that they are concerned with protecting people in their belonging and/or practice of whatever outlook they choose or find themselves in; treating people equally whatever their option; and giving them all a hearing. There is no reason to single out religious (as against nonreligious), ‘secular’ (in another widely used sense), or atheist viewpoints. Indeed, the point of state neutrality is precisely to avoid favoring or disfavoring not just religious positions, but any basic position, religious or nonreligious. We can’t favor Christianity over Islam, but also we can’t favor religion over against nonbelief in religion, or vice versa.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty

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1 Gov, 7 congressional races still to be decided

German Finance Minister: “US has lived on borrowed money for too long”

China to tighten control on inflows of overseas funds

National Cancer Institute should tell women of abortion-breast cancer link

Minn. judge refuses to dismiss assisted suicide case

Woman gives birth to homosexual son’s baby

Phyllis Schlafly: Judges get their comeuppance

Two more Christians killed in Iraq; massacre-site church re-opens

Same-sex “marriage” not likely in Maine

Supreme Court to hear argument on the citizenship rights of non-marital children, part 2

Kagan may decide ObamaCare despite admin role

Muslim accommodation makes waves at George Washington University

WSJ: Palin’s dollar, Zoellick’s gold

    Wall Street Journal: “It would be hard to find two more unlikely intellectual comrades than Robert Zoellick, the World Bank technocrat, and Sarah Palin, the populist conservative politician. But in separate interventions yesterday, the pair roiled the global monetary debate in complementary and timely fashion . . . Misguided monetary policy can ruin an Administration as thoroughly as higher taxes and destructi’ve regulation, and the new GOP majority in the House and especially the next GOP President need to be alert to the dangers.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: online.wsj.com

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Pat Buchanan: The murderers of Christianity

David French: Money, politics, and same-sex “marriage”

US Senators resume DADT debate

American Legion: Listen to USMC warnings about lifting DADT

McCain fights White House on DADT

Cantor, Republicans signal Obama tax proposal is dead in the water

Tony Blair: Making Muslim integration work

The ACLU stands up for pro-lifers—really

WSJ: Union card checkmate

    Wall Street Journal (full text via Google News): “Americans want workers to be able to join a union if they freely choose one, but only when they are organized through honest, democratic elections. Republicans should be able to block card check legislation in the lame duck and the 112th Congress, but states can protect their economies from the NLRB with initiatives like those that passed last week.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

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Leader says Oklahoma’s Muslim community is feeling backlash from Sharia law amendment

2 lawsuits challenge US Defense of Marriage Act

GLAD: Same sex couple to sue over U.S. marriage law

Lambda Legal: “Application of DOMA to block health benefits for wife of lesbian federal court employee unconstitutional”

Philadelphia Inquirer: Targeting judges

New York Times: A blow to the courts

How did elections affect Pa. “merit selection” battle?

ACLU: “Bereaved spouse challenges Federal DOMA as unconstitutional”

Thomas Sowell: Stopping judicial imperialism

“Republican activists in Congress choke courts”

Cert. filed in Seventh Day Adventist case: Does RFRA apply to suits between private parties?

Some Democrats tell Pelosi: Take a hike

Supreme Court: Health care case denied

    Lyle Denniston reports at SCOTUSblog: “The Supreme Court on Monday turned aside the first attempt to pursue in the Court a constitutional challenge to the new federal health care law. The initial test sought to draw the Justices into the nationwide controversy over the law, before any federal appeals court has ruled on it. The Court’s order denying review of Baldwin v. Sebelius (10-369) indicated that there were no dissents and no recusals.”


  • Posted: 11/09/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.scotusblog.com

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