Pentagon investigates leak on DADT study

“Updated LDS handbook softens language on gays”

    Salt Lake Tribune: “A newly published compilation of LDS guidelines — used by all church leaders worldwide when dealing with their members — has softened the language about gay Mormons . . . Like most recent LDS Church statements, this new handbook makes a clear distinction between same-sex orientation and behavior. It eliminates the suggestion, mentioned in the previous 2006 edition, that same-sex relationships ‘distort loving relationships’ and that gays should repent of their ‘homosexual thoughts or feelings.’”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.sltrib.com

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Barclays to reimburse “gay” workers for taxes on U.S. benefits

UK: West Yorkshire teacher had lesbian affair with 15-year-old student

Finland: Lutheran Synod votes for compromise on same-sex couples

“Male gay sex consent laws” to be considered by Gibraltar Supreme Court

FL: Cape Coral Mayor wants Ten Commandments in gov’t building; FFRF objects

School choice in Canada: Lessons for America

Charter schools retain students better than nearby public schools

1st Circuit rejects First Amendment challenge to the Pledge of Allegiance

Campus political correctness and the costs of free speech

Proposition 8 litigators present their cases at Virginia law school

In the Philippines, church and state row over family planning

Elizabeth Marquardt: Why your “good enough” marriage is good for your kids

    Elizabeth Marquardt writing at the Huffington Post: “[S]ocial science research shows that about two-thirds of marriages that end in divorce are low conflict. These marriages may feel troubled to the one or both of the spouses, but they are not struggling with the kinds of serious or frequent conflict many imagine when they picture a marriage on the rocks. It is these marriages — what some call ‘good enough’ marriages — that matter so much. To any still-married parent who is considering divorce who may be reading this, I want to affirm that your ‘good enough’ marriage is doing a world of good for your kids.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

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David French: Debating marriage

Colombian Constitutional Court blocks same-sex “marriage”

Conservatives hope for marriage amendment in NC

Amsterdam ready to restart Wilders’ trial

First signed opinion of Supreme Court term coming Monday

Law Review: The Road Not Taken: The EU as a Global Human Rights Actor

    Grainne De Burca, The Road Not Taken: The EU as a Global Human Rights Actor (November 8, 2010). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1705690

    “This paper challenges the traditional account of the EU’s engagement with human rights. The classic narrative begins with the silence of the EEC Treaty in 1957 and depicts a gradual engagement with human rights over the decades, culminating in the establishment of a substantial EU human rights regime in recent years. The paper provides an alternative account of the EU’s trajectory by returning to its origins in the 1950s and comparing the ambitious but long-forgotten plans for European Community engagement with human rights drafted in the early 1950s with today’s EU human rights framework. The paper argues that the current EU human rights system is in several ways less robust and less ambitious than that envisaged in the 1950s, and that the two main causes for criticism of today’s EU system – namely that it lacks a serious human rights mechanism, and that there is a double-standard as between internal and external human rights policies – have survived the changes introduced by the Lisbon Treaty and have to some extent been enshrined by those changes. The paper concludes by suggesting that the EU’s aspiration to be taken seriously as a global normative actor is hindered by its exceptionalism in this field.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Global: Bench and Bar
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Comparative Law in the Reasoning of the European Court of Human Rights

Law Review: The Use of International Law in U.S. Constitutional Adjudication

    Rex D. Glensy, The Use of International Law in U.S. Constitutional Adjudication (August 15, 2010). Emory International Law Review, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1701508

    “This Article seeks to untangle part of the debate concerning the use of international law as persuasive authority within the context of U.S. constitutional interpretation. It begins by noting that international law is being used comparatively within the framework of constitutional analysis but such usage lacks structure and context. It then posits that U.S. courts should only use international law as persuasive authority when this fits within the goals of the comparative enterprise. By combining comparative theory and historical practice, the Article concludes by proposing a methodology for employing international law as persuasive authority by U.S. Courts.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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The case for anonymous juries

    Steve Cohen writing in City Journal: “For judges hearing high-profile cases, this lack of juror anonymity can present serious problems. The most obvious is outright jury tampering. Though that isn’t common, more than a few instances have been uncovered . . . And then there’s the media. Most newspapers and television networks won’t attempt to contact a juror during a trial. But after a verdict comes down, juror privacy is irrelevant for a determined reporter . . . No right in the U.S. Constitution guarantees defendants access to juror information. Federal case law and judicial practice make that clear.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.city-journal.org

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VA: Warren school board proceeding with religious exemption regulation

Top Malaysian court fails to rule on child conversion

NM school board committee affirms contraception distribution policy

CA: Temecula mosque hearing delayed

Egyptian held for promoting religious conversion at Navi Mumbai port

Australia: MPs set to debate same-sex “marriage” law, protection for religious ministers

German gov, orthodox Jews disagree over educational funds

Va. Muslim denied service over religious head scarf

Radical Muslim cleric sentenced to life in Lebanon

Jehovah’s Witnesses seek new building property in Brooklyn, OH

Christians in Iraq living in fear of “pogrom” after bomb attacks

Defenders of marriage see golden opportunity in Republican takeover of Minn. Legislature

Ban on circumcision proposed in San Francisco

NJ woman given $25K in suit over Muslim garb

“Pentagon group finds there is minimal risk to lifting gay ban during war”

Cindy McCain splits with husband on DADT

Amazon U-turn in face of pedophile guide fury; police investigate author

CA: School forces boy to take American flag off bike

    KSBW: “A Stanislaus County school is forcing a student to take an American flag off of his bike . . . officials at Denair Middle School told him he couldn’t fly it. He said he was told some students had complained.”

    Eugene Volokh comments at The Volokh Conspiracy: “[I]f there is a reasonably predictable likelihood (not just a bare conjecture) that speech or expressive conduct will cause substantial disruption — which is not clear under these facts — then the school may legally restrict it without violating the First Amendment.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.ksbw.com

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Vote for civil unions in Illinois?

The OK referendum prohibiting state courts from applying international or sharia law

Palestinian held for Facebook criticism of Islam

Steele draws challenger for GOP chairman

New York Times: Video games and the First Amendment

WA pharmacy board moves ahead on rule change to permit facilitated referrals

CA: Judge OK’s public funding of spiritualist-based schools

Lame ducks vs. the Constitution

    Washington Post: “During the darkest days of the Depression, Time magazine spied a ray of light: Congress passed the 20th Amendment, which ‘promised to eliminate the legislative influence of Senators & Representatives whose constituencies have already repudiated them’ . . . Why, then, is the lame-duck Congress coming to Washington on Monday? Because of a dispute between the House and Senate over the text of the amendment.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.washingtonpost.com

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UN human rights panel lectures US on pro-abortion CEDAW treaty

Family under attack by new ideologies that “trivialize the human body”: Pope Benedict

Planned Parenthood says graphic sex guide for youth is a best seller

Obama: Fed action not designed to weaken dollar

“Transgender” people find their voice at NC school

U.S. grilled on “human rights” by UN panel: Emphasizes homosexual rights efforts

Like marriage, committed relationships may protect against stress

Reasons for having sex influence satisfaction, study finds

Planned Parenthood abortion biz president makes about $400,000

Two-thirds of Britons support legal euthanasia

Stocks drop on China inflation worries

Out-of-wedlock births in Michigan: Everyone pays a high price

Pat Buchanan: The Fed trashes the dollar

FRC calls for Department of Defense to investigate leaks regarding report on homosexuality in the military

G-20 refuses to back US push on China’s currency

ACLU, Amnesty, Human Rights Watch won’t stand up to Islam

More federal workers’ pay tops $150,000

Helen Alvaré: Abortion law is family law

EU in Kosovo probes organ trafficking

How obscene is video game violence?

Does the timing of “gay rights” litigation matter?

U.S.: “Don’t interrupt gay ban”

The Obamacare burden to your state budget

    Conn Carroll writing at the Heritage Foundation / The Foundry: “The crisis facing states across the country is that Obamacare forces states to massively expand their already burdensome Medicaid rolls. Starting in 2014 states must expand Medicaid to all non-elderly individuals with family incomes below 138 percent of the federal poverty level. At first, Obamacare picks up the first three years of benefit costs for expansion. But in 2017 states begin to shoulder a larger and larger share of these benefit costs, maxing out at 10 percent by 2020.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: blog.heritage.org

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Brent Bozell: The vast child-fattening conspiracy

Nine out of 10 write-in votes for Murkowski went unchallenged

    The Hill: “Almost 90 percent of the first round of write-in ballots counted in Alaska on Wednesday were unchallenged votes for Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R). Repubican challenger Joe Miller’s campaign observers challenged 8.5 percent of the ballots, but were only successfully in setting aside 1.44 percent of the 19,203 write-in votes counted, according to the Anchorage Daily News.”


  • Posted: 11/12/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: thehill.com

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