Archbishop Kurtz: A “Roe moment” for marriage?

9th Circuit refuses to consider CLS claims on remand from Supreme Court

UN Committee debates the “right to sexual and reproductive health”

“Gender-blind” housing under consideration at “Catholic” Georgetown University

Vallejo, CA debates “pro-gay” film for elementary students

    EarnedMedia: “The controversy centers around three films, ‘That’s a Family,’ ‘Let’s Get Real,’ and ‘Straightlaced,’ that promote the idea that gay relationships are just as normal as any other family structure. The films are being mandated as part of a legal settlement between the ACLU and VCUSD. A parent questioned the District’s refusal to allow objecting families to opt out of the instruction, which has been mandated for all students in the District – including first-graders. The Vallejo City Unified School District governing board will hear from the community and discuss the issue Wednesday night beginning at 5 p.m.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: www.earnedmedia.org

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Kay S. Hymowitz: To fix poverty, first fix the family

    Union Leader: “The articles in the issue are based on findings from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, which has followed 5,000 children and their urban, primarily minority parents since the kids were born in the late 1990s. The study constitutes the most extensive, long-term database on the family lives of the urban poor we’ve ever had, and the dismal picture that it paints of low-income, unmarried couples and their children has nothing to do with the Great Recession.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: www.unionleader.com

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Oklahoma ban on international and sharia law defended by U.S. Border Control

Muslims harassed during prayer festival in Greece

LGBT issues poised to be hot debate at MN capitol

Federalist convention comes at right time for potential hill staffers

Scholar presses for more Supreme Court diversity

Democrats plan votes on controversial nominees, Senator says

Low-tax states will gain seats, high-tax union states will lose them

Yes, DADT repeal could still pass, Senate staffers say

Murkowski wins reelection in Alaska Senate campaign

Canadian “gay” custody battle could redefine parenthood

AR: Teen girl can wear tuxedo in yearbook picture

Canada: Ottawa-Carleton District School Board to delay sexual orientation survey

Peter Lawler: Locke and today’s judicial activism on marriage

Breyer says Justices must adapt to Facebook world

    NPR: “The 72-year-old justice said in a speech at Vanderbilt Law School on Tuesday that he was perplexed when he recently saw the film ‘The Social Network’ about the origins of Facebook. But Breyer said the film illustrates his argument that modern conditions — like the development of the social-networking site — should inform justices when interpreting a Constitution written in the 18th century.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.npr.org

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UK: Concern over “pornographic” NHS videos aimed at kids

UK: Fire brigade cuts Christian references from Remembrance service

Embryonic stem cells are over-hyped, says scientist

Doctor defends Octomom’s fertility treatments

Australian surrogacy law “of grave concern”

Canada: Fertility agency chief domineering, MPs told

The legalism of political Christianity

    Jordan Ballor writing at The Acton Institute: “What is shared in what we might call the “legalistic impulse” of much of both conservative and progressive political Christianity is the priority of the role of the government in determining the course of our social life. Both versions of political Christianity, to one extent or another, subsume the Church under the State as a kind of activist lobby (albeit of a special religious character). In this brand of legalism, fidelity to the Christian faith is defined in political terms.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.acton.org

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Saudi Arabian gov’t blocks Facebook over moral concerns

Switzerland: Minaret ban stays in media focus one year on

Clinton: US opposes religious defamation bans

David French: The crushing burden of divorce

Pelosi elected minority leader

Secretary Clinton releases annual report on int’l religious freedom today

    Secretary Clinton: “Good afternoon. It’s my pleasure to join you today for the release of the State Department’s Annual Report on International Religious Freedom. Every year, the State Department prepares a comprehensive review of the status of religious freedom in countries and territories around the world. We do this because we believe that religious freedom is both a fundamental human right and an essential element to any stable, peaceful, thriving society.” Video available at link.

    2010 Report on International Religious Freedom

    U.S. Department of State: “Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will release the 2010 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom on Wednesday, November 17, at 1:20 p.m. in the Press Briefing Room at the U.S. Department of State.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty

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Center for Reproductive Rights: Costa Rica’s new IVF law “unacceptable”

President Obama signs Executive Order to reform Faith-Based Initiative

The Left’s delusion over Islam is baffling to Middle Eastern Christians

WA attorney general’s power questioned in lawsuits

Lynch to nominate Lynn to NH Supreme Court

Washington center that did secret abortion on teen closes

Idaho: No harm in prayers at Pocatello City Council

Congressional hearing on Thursday on Obama faith-based initiative

Law Review: Burning Crosses on Campus: University Hate Speech Codes

    Alexander Tsesis, Burning Crosses on Campus: University Hate Speech Codes (November 5, 2009). Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 43, No. 2, December 2010. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1467970

    “Debates about the value and constitutionality of hate speech regulations on college campuses have deeply divided academics for over a decade. The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Virginia v. Black, recognizing a state’s power to criminalize intentionally intimidating cross burning, at long last provides the key to resolving this heated dispute. The opponents of hate speech codes argue that such regulation guts our concept of free speech. One prominent scholar claims that this censorship would nullify the First Amendment and have “totalitarian implications.” Another constitutional expert, Erwin Chemerinsky, asserts that the “public university simply cannot prohibit the expression of hate, including anti-Semitism, without running afoul of [established First Amendment principles].”

    On the other end of the spectrum, are authors who argue that hate speech attacks individuals’ Fourteenth Amendment right to equality, which outweighs any cathartic desire to degrade people because of their race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and religion. This line of thinking, recognizes the fundamental right to free speech but argues that it can be restrained when used to intrude on others’ dignity rights. The advocates of campus hate speech codes claim that a college’s mission to further intellectual freedom is not undermined by restricting intimidating speech on campus; consequently, some scholars argue that curbing racist and xenophobic speech would not undermine the core purpose of higher education, the acquisition of truth.

    Both factions have relied on the Supreme Court’s First Amendment precedents to bolster their separate claims. Opponents of university hate speech regulations have often based their arguments with R.A.V. v. St. Paul, in which the majority found a municipal ordinance against cross burning to be unconstitutional. Following the rationale of that case, libertarians and several lower federal courts have asserted that university administrators lack the authority to prevent the spread of vitriol, no matter how racist, xenophobic, or sexist. Eleven years later, in a quiet coup, the Court upheld a more rigorously drafted cross burning statute than the one struck down in R.A.V. The later decision, Virginia v. Black, defined the scope of legitimate limitations on destructive messages.

    This article adds a fresh perspective to this decades-old academic tempest of intellectual disagreement about First Amendment theory. It first discusses the current problem of hate speech on college campuses. It then turns to a survey of United States First Amendment jurisprudence that is relevant to the regulation of hate speech on campus. Then it provides a comparative analysis of International and European regulations of hate speech. The section compares and contrasts international approaches to that of the United States. In the final portion of the article, I analyze the narrow and broad implications of the Supreme Court’s rational in Virginia v. Black to develop two forms of college hate speech regulations that are likely to withstand First Amendment challenges.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Tories risk fresh embarrassment over EU bedfellows

Australia: Marriage vote expected on Thursday

CO: “Marriage is so gay” T-shirt allowed back in school

All charges dropped against pro-life pastor

UN panel cuts “gay” reference from violence measure

Dems vote to go ahead with leadership elections

Albania advocates push for “gay rights” in the military

German church allows “gay” pastors to live with partners

El Paso: Effort to override citizen referendum fails; partner benefits not restored

“Time to end government handouts based on religion”

    Marci A. Hamilton writing at Patheos: “We face high unemployment, gigantic government overruns, and serious needs among citizens for meaningful and strong social services. If the federal government is going to subsidize social services, it has the obligation to demand the highest quality. And anyone working with those funds should have to be chosen based on credentials and experience, not religious identity. Any argument for a ‘bye’ just because a group is religious is just bad public policy.”

    Joseph Knippenberg responds at First Things / First Thoughts: “There are at least four issues here that require more nuance than Professor Hamilton . . . provides. First, the conflict isn’t always between religious affiliation and professional credentials. Most faith-based social service organizations require some credential other than or in addition to faithful adherence to the organization’s mission.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty

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How Obamacare burdens already strained state budgets

    How Obamacare Burdens Already Strained State Budgets
    Lanhee Chen, Ph.D.

    “A growing number of state budgets are in danger of collapsing under multibillion-dollar deficits—and are about to be burdened with billions more in costs imposed by the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Huge numbers of additional Medicaid enrollees and associated administrative costs will force states to raise taxes, go into even deeper debt, or most likely, to cut spending in crucial areas like public safety or education. While PPACA’s costliest provisions do not go into effect until 2014, state policymakers have no time to lose. They must use this three-year window to lay the groundwork for sound policies that will protect taxpayers, control health care costs, and expand choices for consumers. This Heritage Foundation Backgrounder details just what is at stake, and why state policymakers must act now.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.heritage.org

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Obama pushes DREAM Act immigration reform for lame-duck Congress

TSA: Religion offers no break on airport screening

UK tribunal rejects religious discrimination claim by adoption panel member

Video of House Rep. Duncan: TSA porno scanners more about money, political payoffs than security

    See this earlier related post: TSA porno scanners not making sense? Follow the money http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xH-dpkJZiOM


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

USCIRF Vice-Chair criticizes Russian laws on extremism

Supreme Court should “adjust its severe approach to content-based regulations”

Iraqi president won’t sign Tariq Aziz death order

18 hurt in Pakistan mosque shootout over prayers

Advisory panel urges action on Chinese currency

Egypt frees blogger convicted of insulting Islam

ADF Allied Attorney Success Stories: November 2010

Pope urges freedom for Pakistani Christian

Ron Paul’s golden opportunity

    Seth Lipsky writing in the Wall Street Journal [full text via Google News]: “One of the most exciting features of the new Congress is the prospect that the chairmanship of a House subcommittee that oversees the Federal Reserve will go to Ron Paul. Final assignments are still being worked out, and the leadership may yet shy away from giving the position to a congressman who doesn’t believe the Fed should exist. But Dr. Paul, an obstetrician, has been the ranking Republican of the Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology subcommittee, and tradition suggests he will be the next chairman.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

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Employees punished for expressing their faith

    Alliance Defense Fund: “To help get the word out [for the 52nd Annual Santa Barbara Community Prayer Breakfast] to local business owners, Craig appeared for 30 seconds in a three-minute promotional video, along with a Santa Barbara-area school superintendent and a local high school teacher. Craig identified himself as the principal of Foothill School, but did not mention the school district. Regardless, a school district board member who viewed the video on the Internet filed a complaint against Craig, wrongly claiming that he had violated the so-called ‘separation of church and state’ . . . Craig contacted ADF for legal assistance and was referred to a local ADF-allied attorney who is now defending Craig’s constitutionally protected freedom of speech in an effort to help him keep his job.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: ADF in the News
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  • Source: www.alliancedefensefund.org

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Jill Stanek: Democrats for Life betrays pro-life movement

Jan LaRue: Madame Ovary of the Minority

NY: Pregnancy center bill brings out foes on abortion

Thomas Fleming reviews book on loyalists of the Revolutionary era

    Thomas Fleming reviews Tories by Thomas B. Allen in the Wall Street Journal: “It is unfortunate that Mr. Allen frames ‘Tories’ as the tale of early victims of American political rage, because there is something to be said for focusing on the loyalists of the Revolutionary era . . . How many Tories resided in the colonies at the outbreak of war? Using the latest research, Mr. Allen reports . . . roughly half a million people. But they were a combative minority: When war came, loyalists formed more than 50 military units that often fought well beside their British allies.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: online.wsj.com

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Senate Dems defend earmarks as GOP votes to ban practice

Michelle Malkin: Dude, where’s my Obamacare waiver?

    Michelle Malkin writing at Townhall: “More than one million Americans have escaped the clutches of the Democrats’ destructive federal health care law. Lucky them. Their employers and labor representatives wisely applied for Obamacare waivers earlier this fall and got out while the getting was good. Now, it’s time for Congress to create a permanent escape hatch for the rest of us. Repeal is the ultimate waiver.”


  • Posted: 11/17/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: townhall.com

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