Same-sex unions corrupt understanding of marriage, says Australian bishop

Mike Huckabee lauds defeat of Iowa Supreme Court judges

Cardinal Giacomo Biffi: Aggressive homosexual ideology silencing Christians

Degradation of women in porn

    Australian Broadcasting Corporation: “[T]he real revelation wasn’t the seedy, vulgar underbelly of hetero porn – that was no surprise to [David Foster Wallace]. It was the trend towards degradation porn, towards the mainstreaming of porn premised on male dominance and female subservience, towards sperm spatters used as evidence of dominance, towards simulated rape porn, sadism with paid consent. That was what really concerned Wallace. And it’s that trend which is the real problem with porn.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.abc.net.au

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Critics blast Obama on faith-based hiring rules

Pence: Don’t forget social issues

    ABC News: “‘People are always saying, “should it be spending or social issues?” How about both?’ Pence said. ‘How about, let’s deny all federal funding to Planned Parenthood of America? That would save $350 million right off the top. I have to tell you as I travel around the country, the American people — millions of Americans, more every day — are offended that the largest abortion provider in America is also the largest recipient of federal funding under Title 10.’”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: blogs.abcnews.com

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Judge dissolves SD Hutterite colony

CA: Judge mulls licensing decision for Octomom doc

CEDAW report pressures nations on abortion as Congress holds hearing

ACLU fights for male contraception buys

Greg Baylor: Catholic colleges, Catholic bishops, and the secular state

Laurence Tribe is leaving Justice job

FRC: Despite media spin, 95% of Americans under 30 plan to tie the knot

Pew Research Center: “The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families”

AP: “Four in 10 say marriage is becoming obsolete”

TIME: “Marriage: What’s It Good For?”

    “Sociologists tend to believe the answers lie outside marriage. Coontz thinks that if we changed our assumptions about alternative family arrangements and our respect for them, people would be more responsible about them. ‘We haven’t raised our expectations of how unmarried parents will react to each other. We haven’t raised our expectations of divorce or singlehood,’ she says. ‘It should not be that within marriage you owe everything and without marriage you don’t owe anything. When we expect responsible behavior outside as well as inside marriage, we actually reduce the temptation to evade or escape marriage.’”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Featured
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  • Source: www.time.com

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Doc says he used “Octomom” in fertility study

Senate Dems want deal with GOP on DADT debate

WA Supreme Court: Teachers can’t have sex with any students

Ireland: Catholic school found guilty of “discrimination” for not hiring Protestant teacher

Same-sex “marriage” to be imposed by EU, group warns

Ireland: Call to give unmarried fathers automatic guardianship rights

Rutgers Prof: Having lots of kids is like littering

UK: Tory voices concern over “gay” actor’s schools’ talks

China’s censors misfire in abuse-of-power case

    New York Times: “Chen Xiaofeng was a poor farm girl. The man accused of killing her, Li Qiming, is the son of Li Gang, the deputy police chief in the Beishi district of Baoding. The tale of her death is precisely the sort of gripping socio-drama — a commoner grievously wronged; a privileged transgressor pulling strings to escape punishment — that sets off alarm bells in the offices of Communist Party censors. And in fact, party propaganda officials moved swiftly after the accident to ensure that the story never gained traction. Curiously, however, the opposite has happened.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Global: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.nytimes.com

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Olson requests changes to 9th Circuit’s Prop 8 argument plan

Obama administration flooding Peru with millions of condoms

Internationalist curriculum infiltrates U.S. schools

    C-FAM: “[O]ne American community has awakened to the International Baccalaureate, a study program quietly embraced by nearly 1,000 U.S. campuses and 139 countries worldwide. While found mostly in public high schools, the curriculum has touched middle and elementary schools, and even a number of Catholic schools . . . The IB comes from a non-profit educational foundation of the same name founded in Switzerland in 1968. Its early money came from the United Nations, as well as the 20th Century Fund and Ford Foundation.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Global: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.c-fam.org

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MT: Sex-ed controversy triggers Helena parents symposium

EU parliament investigates alleged “homophobic attack” on MEP

Philadelphia would sell building to Boy Scouts under proposed settlement

NJ lawmakers introduce federal “anti-bullying” bill

UN urges “social” approach against female genital mutilation

Scottish Parliament is told to reject assisted death Bill

EU commissioner questions Polish-church bar on “gay” teachers

PA: Chester County takes control of courthouse holiday display

PA: DuBois school board receives complaints about Santa play

Religious groups search for a space of their own at Barnard College

Conn. government threatening religious freedom, Bishop Lori warns

Court: Calif marriage case may be broadcast

New Jersey Supreme Court rejects bid to recall Senator Robert Menendez

Christian father and daughter killed in Iraq

Spanish prime minister defends pro-abort policies in face of papal criticism

CWA: A vote for Robert Chatigny is a vote against women

Same-sex “marriage” and the defeat of Iowa Supreme Court Justices

Six pupils excluded from school over Facebook hate campaign against classmate who paid tribute to British troops

Congressman warns of pro-abortion CEDAW treaty before hearing

Michelle Obama picks abortion advocate as new chief of staff

Senate vote likely on Providence lawyer John J. McConnell Jr.’s nomination

“Lightning divorces” strike China’s “Me Generation”

Ann Coulter: Reduce TSA 90%, we know the terrorists are swarthy, foreign-born Muslim males

    Ann Coulter writing at Townhall: “Fortunately, that’s the one advantage we have in this war. In a lucky stroke, all the terrorists are swarthy, foreign-born, Muslim males. Only because the terrorists are Muslims do we pretend not to notice who keeps trying to blow up our planes . . . If the government did nothing more than have a five-minute conversation with the one passenger per flight born outside the U.S., you’d need 90 percent fewer Transportation Security Administration agents and airlines would be far safer than they are now. Instead, Napolitano just keeps ordering more invasive searches of all passengers, without exception — except members of Congress and government officials, who get VIP treatment, so they never know what she’s doing to the rest of us.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: townhall.com

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Report: Online video providers not protecting kids

New survey identifies religious concerns for 2012 election

Russia OKs draft bill on church property restitution

In battle for Texas House Speaker, religion becomes an issue

California bond woe bodes ill for states

Supreme Court of South Australia grants injunction against street preachers

Vatican warns China over bishop’s ordination

Australia: Kids told not to reference God or Jesus in school concert

FL: Sanford Airport to opt out of TSA screening

    WDBO: “The backlash continues over those new TSA screening measures, and now one Central Florida airport has decided to go with a private security screening firm. Orlando Sanford International Airport has decided to opt out from TSA screening.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: wdbo.com

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Lambda Legal urges IL General Assembly to pass civil unions bill in current veto session

Medicare finalizes new rules to require equal visitation rights for all hospital patients

“Significant” church tax battle

New York City Council considers “crippling” crisis pregnancy center bill

Vancouver council unanimously backs “transgender” bill

Judge refuses to stop construction of Tenn. mosque

Al-Qaeda terrorist acquitted of all but one charge in civilian court, Judge barred key witness

“Obama, Reid to push ahead on ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ repeal”

Video of Ron Paul, introduces TSA legislation: Enough is Enough, government is treating us like cattle, time to throw off the shackles

    “But what we are doing and what we are accepting and putting up with at the airports is so symbolic of us just not standing up and saying enough is enough. I know the American people are starting to wake up, but our government, those in charge, Congress, as well as the executive branch, are doing nothing.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Featured

Law Review: The Curious Persistence of Blasphemy

    Jeremy J. Patrick, The Curious Persistence of Blasphemy (November 17, 2010). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1710446

    “Despite expectations to the contrary, blasphemy laws and their modern-day counterparts persist in a surprising number of jurisdictions around the globe. This article discusses four examples: the ‘defamation of religion’ movement at the United Nations, the surprising resurrection of blasphemy law in Ireland, the Australian trend toward enacting “religious vilification” laws, and the problem of formal illegality and private violence for blasphemous speech in Pakistan. Next, blasphemy is considered from three conceptual angles: the religious, the legal, and the secular/cultural. Last, the curious persistence of blasphemy is examined through an inquiry into why people blaspheme to begin with, and what harms (real or perceived) are caused by blasphemy. The conclusion here is that as long as societies hold something sacred – religiously or culturally – blasphemy will remain an operative concept and legal or social pressure to suppress blasphemous statements will continue to persist.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Mapping the Female Body in Gonzales V. Carhart

    Jessie Hill, Dangerous Terrain: Mapping the Female Body in Gonzales V. Carhart (November 15, 2010). Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 19, No. 3, p. 1, 2010; Case Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2010-38. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1709525

    “The body occupies an ambiguous position within the law. It is, in one sense, the quintessential object of state regulatory and police power, the object that the state acts both upon and for. At the same time, the body is often constructed in legal discourse as the site of personhood – our most intimate, sacred, and inviolate possession. The inherent tension between these two concepts of the body permeates the law, but it is perhaps nowhere more prominent than in the constitutional doctrine pertaining to abortion. Abortion is one of the most heavily regulated medical procedures in the United States, and yet it is at the same time the subject of relatively robust constitutional privacy protections – often even treated as synonymous with the word “privacy” itself.

    Several themes emerge from this close reading of the Court’s rhetoric: disappearance, dismemberment, and displacement of borders. These themes intertwine to construct the female body as a sort of geographical space, a dangerous terrain that not only permits but also requires regulation. This Article contends that Gonzales represents a uniquely literal and uniquely visual representation of those concepts. Indeed, the notions of disappearance, dismemberment, and displacement of borders are united by their association with this case’s unusually graphic – that is to say visual – approach. The Article then concludes with some brief reflections on the significance of the Court’s language in the context of abortion law in general.

    This brief Article focuses on the rhetoric of the body in abortion law – specifically, on how the Supreme Court’s language constructs the female body in Gonzales v. Carhart, which upheld the federal Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act against a constitutional challenge. A number of commentators have remarked upon the troubling rhetoric employed by Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion in that case, primarily because of its paternalistic and sentimental view of motherhood. But the focus of this Article is on the often overlooked, yet equally striking, language of the Court’s opinion that graphically describes and details the regulated abortion procedure itself.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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Law Review: Religious Symbols in Germany

    Tobias Lock, Religious Symbols in Germany (November 15, 2010). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1709291

    “The paper is concerned with religious symbols in Germany. It mainly focuses on decisions by the Federal Constitutional Court on religious symbols in schools. Court had to deal with two landmark cases concerning the topic of religious symbols. The facts and the outcome of the first decision very much resemble those in the recent Lautsi case: the parents of a child objected to a Bavarian law requiring that a crucifix be affixed in every class room. The Court regarded this as a violation of the student’s freedom of religion. The second case added another dimension: the school authority refused to employ a Muslim teacher who insisted on wearing a headscarf in class. In that case not only the students’ freedom of religion was at issue but also that of the teacher. The Court managed to avoid a ruling on this conflict of fundamental rights by arguing that the school authority had acted without a legislative basis, which made the refusal to employ the teacher illegal. The paper will look at the arguments made in the academic discussion and by inferior courts (most importantly by the Federal Administrative Court). Furthermore, it will examine the reaction by the legislatures of the Länder, which ranged from categorically banning all religious symbols to allowing only those which are in accordance with ‘Christian and occidental cultural and educational values’, a provision which was upheld by the Bavarian Constitutional Court. The paper also discusses unsuccessful challenges under anti-discrimination law as well as the possibilities of banning religious symbols worn by students.”


  • Posted: 11/18/2010
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  • Category: Global: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: ssrn.com

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