Montana Supreme Court: Ban on religious speech at graduation is unconstitutional

Spain to pass law to allow death “with dignity”

Sen. Barbara Boxer Likens U.S. to Iran, North Korea and Pakistan Because U.S. Bans Homosexuals From Military

Pro-life groups lobby on chairmanship

Abortion and the 2010 elections

Video/Live Blog: Jordan Lorence at Federalist Society panel on CLS v. Martinez

Archbishop of Canterbury says defections will cause challenges for the Church

Third challenge to Louisiana abortion law

Ghana: Government will not tax churches, says Minister for Information

MI: Holland considers religious exemption to discrimination ordinance

Sharia decision lets baby boy into New Zealand

IL: School officials mull change in religious conflicts policy

Lilburn, GA to hold public meeting over mosque

If DADT goes, Harvard pledges to bring back ROTC

Houston, TX: “Transgender” judge appointment angers pastors

Illinois parental notification on abortion law gets more legal support

Burmese Baptist church ordered to halt worship services

APA joins amicus brief in support of same-sex “marriage”

Scalia “wouldn’t have liked” being Chief Justice

Same-sex “marriage” to be law: Australian union boss

Religious people most charitable says study

    Iona Institute: “Religious people far more charitable than their non-religious counterparts, according to a new study. The research, carried out by leading academic Dr Robert Putnam and David E. Campbell, lecturer in political science at the University of Notre Dame found that, while secular Americans tended to be somewhat more tolerant, religious people were much more likely to be help the poor and the elderly.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.ionainstitute.org

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Nobel Peace Prize case study: China’s growing power threatens liberty

Scottish euthanasia bill rejected overwhelmingly by committee

“#ihadanabortion and I hate myself”

Iraqi Christians flee after violence

Canada: Carleton University Student Association may change stance on pro-life groups

MI: Superior Township delays vote on proposed sexually oriented business

Lieberman says Democrats will have votes to repeal DADT

Pentagon “aware” of China Internet rerouting

A case study in trains: China stealing technology from American companies that export American jobs

Vanderbilt considering mixed-gender dormitories

Canada: When a mother is on trial, the father is the accused

ENDA in sight . . . or is it?

Americans want marriage, despite 40 percent who say it’s obsolete

    The Star-Ledger: “The Pew Research Center’s latest survey did turn up that growing perception of marriage’s obsolescence. It neglected, however, to ask people what they felt about it . . . It turns out Americans love marriage. They hope to marry, and most eventually will. Those who called marriage obsolete may be voicing a fear, not expressing a wish, says David Popenoe, the former Rutgers sociology professor and co-director of the National Marriage Project.” | More information in yesterday’s headlines in the ADF Alliance Alert


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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Few businesses sprout, with even fewer jobs

    Wall Street Journal: “Fewer new businesses are getting off the ground in the U.S., available data suggest, a development that could cloud the prospects for job growth and innovation . . . The number of companies with at least one employee fell by 100,000, or 2%, in the year that ended March 31, the Labor Department reported Thursday.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: online.wsj.com

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Dallas ISD adopts anti-bullying policy that includes protections for “gay” students

Muslims in US trying to impose Sharia: report

David W. Virtue: “The true legacy of Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson”

    David W. Virtue writing at Virtue Online: “There is something entirely disingenuous about the bishop’s claims. Whatever ‘toll’ or ‘strain’ he is talking about is entirely self-induced, if not self-inflicted. No one said he had to come out. No one said he had to run for bishop though he tried in three dioceses before he hit pay dirt in New Hampshire . . . Among his legacies will be the formation of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). Robinson may take pride in the fact that over 100,000 former Episcopalians and some 900 churches have absconded from TEC forcing the national church and four dioceses to spend millions of dollars defending their right to properties.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: www.virtueonline.org

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Lord Blair says religion is regarded as “irrelevant, old-fashioned and violent”

Preview of possible outcomes of Proposition 8 argument before the 9th Circuit

Couple’s abortion vote site declared a pro-life publicity stunt

Pro-lifers and “repeal and replace”

    James C. Capretta writing at Public Discourse: “Richard Stith, a pro-life law professor at Valparaiso University, is urging his fellow pro-lifers to stay off the ‘repeal and replace’ bandwagon. In an article for First Things online, he has suggested that a more promising approach for pro-lifers is amending the new law with clear pro-life language . . . No one suggests that all pro-lifers must adhere to this kind of thinking and support ‘repeal and replace.’ But, at the same time, it should not be expected that all pro-lifers will be satisfied with adding a Hyde-like amendment to what has already been passed.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life

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Washington Times: Muslims seek special treatment to elude TSA groping

    Washington Times: “Note to terrorists: Next time, wear a hijab. The Department of Homeland Security reportedly is giving special exemptions to their “enhanced pat-down” policy to Muslim women wearing the hijab or other form-concealing garments. Last week, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) issued a ‘travel advisory’ noting that women who are patted down ‘should remind the TSA officer that they are only supposed to pat down the area in question, in this scenario, your head and neck.’”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.washingtontimes.com

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Boehner will discuss debt ceiling with freshmen lawmakers

Reid, Senate Dems go hardball on taxes

    The Hill: “Reid will force a vote on extending tax cuts for families earning below $250,000 and individuals below $200,000 that would allow tax rates on the wealthy to expire. But it’s not clear whether that vote will be on a permanent or temporary extension because of a split in the Democratic caucus, a notable change since the election.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: thehill.com

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Religious celebrations on public property approved by Virginia AG

Philadelphia plan to sell building to Boy Scouts hits a snag; ACLU objects

2,000 fetuses found at Thai Buddhist temple

Stocks dip as China forces banks to raise reserves

Bernanke takes aim at China

Pat Buchanan: Who fed the tiger?

50 Church of England priests may convert to Roman Catholicism

Cardinals talk religious freedom amid China flap

Web censorship bill sails through Senate Judiciary Committee

Prop. 8 case on TV

Int’l sports officials to issue guidelines on gender cases

“Justices are long on words but short on guidance”

    Adam Liptak writing in the New York Times: “The Supreme Court under the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is often criticized for issuing sweeping and politically polarized decisions. But there is an emerging parallel critique as well, this one concerned with the quality of the court’s judicial craftsmanship. In decisions on questions great and small, the court often provides only limited or ambiguous guidance to lower courts.”

    Orin Kerr responds at The Volokh Conspiracy: “No matter what Supreme Court opinions look like, there will always be someone who criticizes them for not being clear enough . . . In my experience, judges and lawyers in the lower courts know exactly what to do with concurrences in Supreme Court opinions that don’t provide the crucial vote. For the most part they just ignore them, unless the concurrences happen to have some language that the lawyer or judge needs to support the argument they’re making anyway.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar

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AU: “Bogus bias battle: Federal court rules against Christian Legal Society – again”

“Anti-gay groups spent $948,000 in Iowa to oust judges”

Law Review: DOMA and the Constitution

    DOMA and the Constitution
    Mark P. Strasser, 58 Drake L. Rev. 1011 (2010)

    “Part II of this Article addresses some of the constitutional issues implicated in the full faith and credit provision and discusses some of the different possible constructions of the provision and the ways that these different constructions would make the provision more or less vulnerable to constitutional attack. Part III analyzes some of the special constitutional difficulties associated with the provision defining marriage for federal purposes. The Article concludes that DOMA is vulnerable on a number of grounds, some peculiar to the jurisprudence associated with the substance of the respective provisions and others that might invalidate both provisions. While it is not clear whether the Supreme Court will ultimately hear a constitutional challenge to DOMA or, if so, how the Court will rule, it is clear that the analysis offered by the Court will likely have important implications for individuals’ rights and for state and congressional powers.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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Law Review: Sensible Legal Approaches to Teenagers’ Exchange of Self-Produced Pornography

    Stemming Sexting: Sensible Legal Approaches to Teenagers’ Exchange of Self-Produced Pornography
    Elizabeth C. Eraker, 25 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 555 (2010)

    “The term sexting often describes a broad range of behaviors that differ radically in terms of the actors, motivations, and tactics involved. In this Note, the term ‘sexting’ refers to the self-production and distribution by cell phone of sexually explicit images in the course of consensual, voluntary activity by teenagers. This definition describes a phenomenon differing from the use of texting by sexual predators to exploit youth, a set of issues that is not addressed here, and the use of sexting to cyberbully. This Note focuses primarily on the typical sexting case involving the limited exchange of provocative messages concerning consensual sexual activity between willing participants.

    The prevalence of sexting and the severity of its consequences have prompted state and federal policymakers to consider various legislative proposals, from crafting new criminal offenses to introducing educational programs. In exploring appropriate legal responses to sexting, this Note attempts to strike a balance between competing policy objectives, such as teenage privacy and the state’s interest in preventing child sexual abuse and child pornography, while respecting the extent to which the digital revolution changed how teenagers communicate and interact in social spaces. While society may want to minimize teenagers’ production and distribution of provocative images even under consensual and private circumstances, sexting should be exempt from treatment under child pornography statutes. In Part I, this Note explores the sexting phenomenon and its underlying causes in the context of a digital generation of teenagers. Part II surveys the varied responses of authorities to sexting incidents, including prosecutors and state legislators. Part III discusses the range of policy issues implicated in designing an appropriate legal framework to address sexting. Part IV concludes by suggesting several legislative components that could help authorities discipline the harms of sexting without resorting to ill-suited child pornography statutes.”


  • Posted: 11/19/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.btlj.org

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Law Review: Same-Sex Second-Parent Adoption and Intestacy Law

Senate Democrats hold hearing to advance feminist treaty