Legal-Courts Can recycled tires really further religion? | OneNewsNow

Christian pre-school excluded from Mo. scrap tire program files appeal

Social conservatives in Iowa rally for life, marriage and family

Faculty members’ free speech rights put to test | OneNewsNow

ADF to Kansas Board of Regents: Rescind anti-social media policy | Caffeinated Thoughts

ADF to Kansas Board of Regents: Rescind anti-social media policy

A Victory for Comfort and Common Sense | Joel Oster at Speak Up Movement

A Page Of History Is Worth A Volume Of Logic | Joel Oster

US Supreme Court to Hear Public Prayer, Abortion, ‘Obamacare’ Cases as New Term Begins | Christian Post

Christian Legal Group Alliance Defending Freedom Defends Colorado Day of Prayer Proclamations in State Supreme Court

After ADF files suit, Louisiana city rediscovers freedom of speech | One News Now

Louisiana Sunday School Ministry Allowed to Resume Outreaches in Public Park Following Lawsuit | ChristianNews.net

High Court to Hear Case Challenging Prayer at Government Meetings

    The New American: But Joel Oster of Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), which is representing the town of Greece in the case, said that the appeals court ruling forces the city to become a prayer monitor in its meetings, and turns the reverent tradition of prayer into a government-supervised affirmative action program. “Since this nation’s founding, public meetings have been opened with prayers offered according to the conscience of the speaker,” noted Oster. “There is no legal reason why a town cannot engage in this practice today with people from within its own community. The district court rightly affirmed the constitutionality of the town’s policy.” He added that secular groups with a grudge against Christianity “cannot be allowed to force local governments to engage in strange hoops and hurdles that effectively eliminate prayers by making them too difficult to take place.”
    Oster pointed out that the U.S. Constitution “has never required any local government to engage in such gymnastics to have prayer, as is clearly seen by the prayers of America’s Founding Fathers. Prayer-givers have a right protected by the First Amendment to engage in speech that reflects their own conscience and religion during such prayers. That does not make the prayers an endorsement by the town itself of any particular religion.” ADF attorney Brett Harvey told National Review . . . In taking the case to the Supreme Court, the ADF has been joined by attorney Thomas Hungar, whom Ken Klukowski of the Family Research Council called “one of the most accomplished Supreme Court litigators in the nation. [more]


  • Posted: 05/29/2013
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  • Category: ADF in the News
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  • Source: www.thenewamerican.com

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Who Said That?: A Simple Question That May Change the Way Courts View Legislative Prayer | Brett Harvey and Joel Oster at Fed Soc

Mo. scrap tire program runs down pre-school | Alliance Defending Freedom

Maine: Rockland reaches tentative settlement over church’s tax payments

Marriage redefinition – implications for churches | Joel Oster on Faith Matters in Maine

How will SSM affect religious freedom? | Joel Oster on Faith Matters in Maine

Boot in Baton Rouge brings lawsuit

Federal Court Rules N.Y. Town’s Prayers Too Christian | The New American

Court rules NY town’s prayer violated Constitution | Fox News

Greece Needs a New Prayer Policy | Findlaw

Court diluting Christian prayer | One News Now

Court rules NY town’s prayer violated Constitution | Federal News Radio

2nd Circuit finds NY town prayers unconstitutional – too many Christian prayers

Joel Oster: Protecting the National Day of Prayer by Celebrating the National Day of Prayer

Attorney: Town ‘targeted’ church because of religion

Suit Challenges Property Tax Treatment of Churches vs. Non-Profits

Maine: Church claims discrimination against Rockland in lawsuit

Joel Oster: Soldiers At Camp Pendleton Have Religious Freedom As Well

Joel Oster: El Paso Mayor to Indict Voters Who Don’t Support His Agenda?

ADF comment on developments in El Paso recall election case at TX Supreme Court

El Paso Christians facing jail time | One News Now

El Paso, Texas Trying to “Silence Christians?” | Opposing Views

Christians Who Signed Petitions Investigated | WND

A Cure for What Jails You | FRC

TX court: Churches can’t petition government | One News Now

TX: El Paso Mayor Fighting Ouster on Gay Rights Vote Counts Rising Legal Bill

TX: Mayor challenging recall effort | OneNewsNow.com

Arkansas Human Services issues proposed rules barring use of tax money to teach religion | The Republic (AP)

Recall: Judge Allows ‘Smoking Gun’ Document On The Record | ABC 7

El Paso City Council Recall: ‘Smoking gun’ document surfaces after hearings end | El Paso Times

Texas Showdown: First Amendment Case Could End Up in High Court | NC Register

Texas Showdown Headed for High Court? | National Catholic Register

Court allows Christians to go forward with El Paso Mayor recall | Examiner.com

TX: Judge likely to allow recall election to proceed

El Paso churches won’t be silenced | OneNewsNow.com

Mayor threatens pastors with felony charges over recall | WorldNetDaily

Mayor John Cook and City Council recall: Residents plead fifth when asked about church ties at hearing

ADF: El Paso mayor on witch-hunt in attempt to stop recall election

Recall lawyer: Churches helped circulate petitions against El Paso mayor, city reps

I-Team: Origin Of District Attorney’s Investigation Into Tom Brown Revealed

‘Church should not be silenced’

First Amendment Group Offers Free Legal Counsel For Pastor Brown | KTSM News Channel 9

ADF attorneys defend church’s right to speak out for El Paso citizens

ADF: Will 2nd Circuit uphold right of NY town to allow prayer before public meetings?

Joel Oster: Ministering to the Congregation Amidst a Scandal

Group strives to change unconstitutional stance

ADF battle against religious discrimination policies at public facilities marches past halfway point

    Sonoran News: Christians shouldn’t be excluded and restricted from using public meeting rooms and other facilities simply because they plan to express a Christian viewpoint,” said ADF Senior Legal Counsel Joel Oster. “The government officials who changed their policies have done the right thing, acknowledging that the Constitution prohibits the government from deciding who can and cannot use space based upon the viewpoints to be discussed at gatherings. We hope the remaining officials will follow the lead of the others and uphold everyone’s First Amendment protected right of free speech.”


  • Posted: 04/29/2011
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  • Category: Uncategorized
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  • Source: www.sonorannews.com

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