The magic spell of “Separation of Church and State!”

    The Stream: “Last I heard, we had separation of church and state in this country,” declared a congressman from Colorado during the debate over health care. “I’ve got to say that I think the Catholic bishops and all of the other groups shouldn’t have input.” He was upset that the Catholic bishops had insisted that the health care bill not include abortion.The Church should just shut up. Christians had no right to speak, as Christians, in public affairs.


  • Posted: 01/28/2015
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: stream.org

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Five facts about the March for Life

The future of Catholic schools and the future of America

March for Life 2015: Forty two years after Roe v. Wade, we still march on

A brief political history of religious exemptions

Erring on the side of life

    The Christian Post: The history of human knowledge as it relates to the human body is a fascinating and terrible thing. In every age, the ability for physicians and other medical practitioners to effectively treat wounds or combat disease has been constrained by the technology – or lack thereof – available at the time. In the past, people often died from illnesses or injuries that are quite treatable today. Over the centuries, we’ve come a long way. Our understanding of human physiology and biology has enabled us to improve quality of life and extend life expectancy beyond anything our ancestors could have imagined.


  • Posted: 01/21/2015
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: www.christianpost.com

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Sex education in America: How yesterday’s extremists shaped today’s sex ed

Five facts about Norma McCorvey of Roe vs. Wade you probably didn’t know

Getting the big thing right: MLK on his day

How Southern Baptists became pro-life

Forty-two years after Roe, we must reaffirm our commitment to protecting human life

Research shows the hands-on dad isn’t a new phenomenon

In celebration of Religious Liberty Day, ‘Je Suis American’

    The Federalist: Over the last week and a half, leaders of nations, dignitaries, Hollywood actors, and flocks of ordinary people posted and tweeted “Je suis Charlie” pins and posters. The “Je Suis Charlie” campaign attracted praise and ire; pundits and writers voiced their opinions in favor and against the slogan and its hashtag version. Fierce arguments broke out over its meaning, use, and potency. But one thing was certain: no American who “suis Charlie” feared arrest or government persecution. Why?


  • Posted: 01/16/2015
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: thefederalist.com

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Pro-lifers plan MLK-style protests to fight for unborn

March on for life

The historical Kevorkian

How many is 57 million?

Women, the pill, and the sexual revolution

If there’s no God, are humans equal? A review of ‘Our Declaration’

Killing has taken its toll: Abortion’s slippery slope has turned into euthanasia

I learned everything I needed to know about marriage from Pride and Prejudice

The night before Christmas when astronauts read from the Bible as they orbited the moon

Religious freedom and American history – a libertarian view

Christmas censorship and the Apollo moon program

What it means to listen: Free speech from the perspective of the Abrahamic religions

The 1950′s, principled pluralism, and the future of America

Why is the abortion rate falling?

Atticus Finch in a skirt

    First Things: Harper Lee, now age eighty-eight and long out of the public eye, is the legendarily mysterious author of the iconic 1961 novel of southern racial injustice, To Kill a Mockingbird. It inspired an equally beloved film with Gregory Peck as heroic small town lawyer Atticus Finch, who defends an innocent black man accused of raping a white woman.


  • Posted: 12/02/2014
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.firstthings.com

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Marriage and the black family

Pastor Johann Christoph Arnold on “God, Sex, and Marriage”

Division and remembrance: Syria past and present

Lowe on American Legal History Since 1998

    Prawfs Blawg: I quite enjoyed Jessica Lowe’s article, Radicalism’s Legacy: American Legal History Since 1998. An economical 12 pages, it surveys developments in American legal history scholarship in the past decade and a half or so, framing it around the continuing influence of Robert Gordon’s famous piece Critical Legal Histories.


  • Posted: 11/18/2014
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: prawfsblawg.blogs.com

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Texas’s latest history textbook tussle

Seven beloved famous people who were wildly pro-eugenics

Should the Supreme Court get involved in church property disputes?

Karen Armstrong’s new rule: Religion isn’t responsible for violence

One trait that set apart the earliest Christians

Antiquities lost, casualties of war: In Syria and Iraq, trying to protect a heritage at risk

The Hyde Amendment at 38

Natural morality, American exceptionalism, and race relations

How the “right to die” came to Europe (part 2)

    The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission: Over the past few decades the Dutch have expanded the scope of protected physician killing to include children. With their parent’s permission, a child between the ages of 12 to 16 years old may request and receive assisted suicide. Initially, minors could obtain an assisted death even if their parents objected, but after domestic and international criticism, the law was changed to require parental consent. Even before the Parliament made it legal to euthanize young children, doctors in the Netherlands took it upon themselves to end the life of infants and others who do not have the free will to agree to end their own lives, but whose existence doctors or parents deemed them “unfit.”


  • Posted: 09/19/2014
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  • Category: Global: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: erlc.com

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How the “right to die” came to Europe (part 1)

#WeAreN: The invisibility of Holy Land Christians

Historic civil rights church to be considered for national recognition

Political sermons in American history

Freedom of religion and freedom of the church

    Library of Law and Liberty: It is widely accepted—in American law, in other countries’ laws, and in human-rights law generally—that “freedom of religion” is fundamental and that it should be protected, respected, and promoted. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948, for example, called on all political communities to “promote respect” for the right to religious freedom and to “secure [its] universal and effective recognition and observance.”


  • Posted: 08/07/2014
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.libertylawsite.org

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Democracy and morality: ancient and modern

The Founding Fathers are no longer viewed as great

NRO interviews historian Rodney Stark: God and Man and Moderns

    National Review Online: “The fundamental advantage was belief in the Judeo-Christian God: a conscious, rational being who created a rational universe that runs according to rational principles that can be discovered and comprehended by human beings. From this came two vital features that separated the West from the rest: faith in reason and faith in progress. As a result, Westerners developed science, because they alone believed it to be possible, and for the same reason they devoted immense efforts to progress, because they assumed everything could be improved. In contrast, both China and the Ottoman Empire not only assumed that the present was inferior to the past, but they often actually hindered progress: Both outlawed mechanical clocks.”


  • Posted: 04/17/2014
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.nationalreview.com

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Evangelicals opposed abortion much earlier than you think

Steven D. Smith: America the religious

    Christopher Shea interviews Steven D. Smith, co-director the UCSD Institute on Law and Religion, at the Boston Globe: “IDEAS: How did cases on funding parochial schools—a 1947 case said the direct funding of religious instruction would be improper—and then the school-prayer decisions of the ’60s mess up the American settlement? / SMITH: The Supreme Court, most importantly with the school-prayer decisions, effectively rescinded that settlement, because the school-prayer decisions effectively said that the constitutional position or orthodoxy was the secularist one. If I can make an analogy, that would be the modern counterpart to a decision in the 16th or 17th centuries that of the two contending sides, the Protestant or the Catholic, one was the preferred party of a realm.”


  • Posted: 03/31/2014
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.bostonglobe.com

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Michael Brendan Dougherty: The religious roots of the elite liberal agenda

    Michael Brendan Dougherty at The Week: “This ‘class’ that has outsized influence on America’s moral and spiritual life is roughly the same class that has always had it: Mainline Protestants, only now without the doctrinal Protestantism or the churchgoing. . . . The post-Protestants Bottum identifies have just that, ‘a social gospel, without the gospel. For all of them, the sole proof of redemption is the holding of a proper sense of social ills. The only available confidence about their salvation, as something superadded to experience, is the self-esteem that comes with feeling they oppose the social evils of bigotry and power and the groupthink of the mob.’”


  • Posted: 03/27/2014
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: theweek.com

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David P. Goldman: The rise of secular religion

Hagia Sophias: From museums to mosques

Mark Tooley: John Wesley and religious freedom

    Mark Tooley at First Things: “Liberal Evangelicals and United Methodists are perhaps ambivalent to indifferent about religious liberty because they have forgotten their own history. Early Methodists, as precursors of modern Evangelicalism, were often despised and persecuted. John Wesley as an evangelist demanded his rights as a British subject to organize and preach an unpopular Gospel that challenged a morally permissive culture. The democratizing ethos created by the Wesleyan revivals helped create a stronger ethic of religious freedom in both Britain and America.”


  • Posted: 03/10/2014
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.firstthings.com

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Dwight G. Duncan: Our legal heritage favors religious freedom

Dumb, uneducated, and eager to deceive: Media coverage of religious liberty in a nutshell

Matthew J. Franck: Where do our religious freedom principles come from?

Mel Bradford on the proper meaning of “establishment” in the First Amendment

    Mark DeForrest at The Imaginative Conservative: “Bradford brings his skills as a literary critic to bear in his discussion of the use of the term “establishment” in the First Amendment. Far from being a term of indefinite or general meaning, Bradford demonstrates that the word was a term of art with a very specific context and usage in 18th century English law, a law with which the Framers of the First Amendment were quite familiar. This usage was concerned not so much with religious activity influencing the government but with the government’s overt sanctioning of specific religious institutions. Combined with this technical reading of the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause, Bradford notes, is the jurisdictional language at the beginning of the Amendment, prohibiting the federal government from addressing religion in the states through congressional action. What the Framers meant the Establishment Clause to do was, quite simply, prevent the creation of a national church with the power to enforce doctrine and demand direct support through taxation.”


  • Posted: 02/21/2014
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.theimaginativeconservative.org

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Originalism: We the People of the Past, the Present, and the Future

Presidential power case before court hinges on history

Interpreting the Constitution Through Original Methods Originalism

Our Normative Argument For Originalism | John McGinnis & Michael Rappaport

    John McGinnis & Michael Rappaport at Volokh Conspiracy: We can summarize our argument in three simple propositions. First, stringent supemajority rules provide the best way to make a national constitution. Second, the United States Constitution was enacted mainly under such rules. Third, it is the original meaning that was enacted under those supermajority rules and therefore it is that meaning that should be followed today.


  • Posted: 01/07/2014
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  • Category: Bench & Bar
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  • Source: www.volokh.com

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Originalism and the Good Constitution

Israel: Christian group plans 100-foot-tall Jesus statue in Muslim-dominated Nazareth

Scotland pushes to bring lingering religious divides into the open

Florida: History textbook under fire in Marion County

Religious Liberty Versus Secular Tyranny

    Ray Nothstine at Acton Institute: James Madison called religious freedom the “lustre of our country” and a guaranteed right elevated above political authority. But in today’s America, some leaders, including President Obama, are trying to redefine the inherent meaning of religious freedom by renaming it “freedom of worship.” This revision implies that you are free to believe and practice what you want as long as it is confined inside the walls of physical houses of worship – a hollow promise compared to the robust guarantee offered by the First Amendment.


  • Posted: 12/18/2013
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: www.acton.org

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Scientists draw up definitive list of genes that make us human

Talking on What Is Marriage? | NRO interviews Robert George

The European crusade against Christianity | Voice of Russia

Archbishop Mamberti: The Concept Of Human Rights Was Born In A Christian Context

Roe v. Wade at 40 | Gerard V. Bradley at Claremont Institute

Dems’ Power Grab Will Cost Them The War Over The Constitution In Court | Ken Klukowski at Breitbart