NRO interview with Bill Bennet: Taking the sex out of texting

    National Review Online: “National Review Online’s Kathryn Jean Lopez talked to Bennett about this private-sector effort to help families . . . KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ: Shouldn’t parents know who is texting their children, and what the communications are about? WILLIAM J. BENNETT: On the first part, absolutely. On the second, yes, in ugly or bad cases. A key thing about allowing children to text and have smartphones is for parents to have a conversation with their children first — a very serious conversation. MouseMail and other products for older children require such a conversation and enhance it.”


  • Posted: 08/12/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: article.nationalreview.com

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Muslims turn to smartphone apps for spiritual help

    The Globe and Mail: “The most ancient traditions of Islam are going high-tech, with a slew of modern offerings for those observing the holy month of Ramadan, which began Wednesday. Cellphone applications such as ‘iPray’ or ‘iQuran’ offer a beeping reminder of requisite prayer times, while the ‘Find Mecca’ and ‘Mosque Finder’ programs help the Muslim traveller in an unfamiliar city find the nearest place to pray.”


  • Posted: 08/12/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.theglobeandmail.com

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Islam’s “virtual battle”

AZ ACLU protests “Internet kill switch”

India steps up demands for BlackBerry access

BlackBerry caved to Saudi demands: rights group

Connecticut AG calls for Craigslist to shut adult section

Bill Gates: In five years the best education will come from the web

Justice Department’s “new strategy” to curb sexual exploitation of children ignores adult pornography

Chinese users report Google page blocked

BlackBerry communications too secure for governments seeking to snoop

    Bloomberg: “For RIM, the pioneer in handheld e-mail devices, security is one of the main advantages it touts over competitors. E-mails its customers send are encrypted and sent through RIM’s own servers and network operation centers, with much of the equipment located in Canada. That security has made BlackBerrys popular with companies and government officials including Barack Obama, who kept his BlackBerry after becoming U.S. president. However, the system also makes it harder for governments to monitor BlackBerry communications than messages from other smartphones, which typically travel across the Internet.”


  • Posted: 08/02/2010
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  • Category: Global: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.bloomberg.com

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Gamer sends boy porn over Xbox

The new Federal Register: ‘USA.gov meets USA Today’

China censors ease up on pornographic websites

Some Internet porn sites in China now accessible

The great firewall of Australia: Political concerns

Law Review: How Google Searches Can Illuminate Miller’s “Contemporary Community Standards”

    Defending Against a Charge of Obscenity in the Internet Age: How Google Searches Can Illuminate Miller’s “Contemporary Community Standards”
    Shannon Creasy, 26 Ga. St. U. L. Rev. 1029 (2010)

    “Whether Miller‘s contemporary community standards test should be completely abandoned has been the subject of much debate and falls outside the scope of this work. To date, most governmental attempts at Internet regulation have been aimed at protecting children from online pornography, which is another issue that falls outside the scope of this work. This Note will, however, explore the challenges the courts have encountered when applying the community standards test, the ways in which both parties have attempted to shed light on Miller’s requirements, and how courts can simplify this process by allowing Internet search engine data to be introduced as evidence of the community’s values. To that end, Part I traces the history of obscenity law in the United States up to the current Miller test. Part II examines the application of the Miller test, analyzing the challenges involved in defining the community and the difficulties defendants face when trying to prove the standard with various types of evidence. Finally, Part III argues in favor of more clearly identifying the relevant community and, under any definition of community, allowing Google searches (and other search engine data) to be admitted as evidence to establish the values of that community.”


  • Posted: 07/21/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

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China satisfied with Google search engine tweak

Examining internet filtering policies and practices to increase student technological learning opportunities

    EducationNews.org: “The purpose of this paper is to encourage a change regarding the current direction and execution of the federal and state regulations regarding Internet filtering by: 1) loosening current Internet filtering; and 2) increasing the dialogue with and education of students regarding students’ developed digital behavior. The intended outcome of these two major proposals is to create an environment in which students could better engage the world via adherence to the NETS, thus better preparing them for aspects of adult life.”


  • Posted: 07/19/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.educationnews.org

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15 nations agree to start working together to reduce cyberwarfare threat

Dozens of outspoken, popular blogs shut in China

China seeks to reduce Internet users’ anonymity

Over 10,000 Unite for Ending Abortion Initiative

FCC indecency rule struck down by appeals court

ACLU, Internet groups sue Mass. over obscenity law that covers IMs, text messages, e-mail

The case for .kids domain

    Jonah Goldberg and Nick Schulz write at EducationNews.org: “A .kids domain would be strictly reserved for material appropriate for minors 18 years and under. Across the country, schools are removing vending machines that contain sugary sodas on the grounds that kids should be kept clear of anything that might contribute to the obesity epidemic.” | The authors also have this article at National Review: Gated or X-Rated? : ”Right now, there are many ‘top-level domains’ — .com, .org, .biz, .gov, .edu., etc. We propose the creation of a .kids domain that would be strictly reserved for material appropriate for minors 18 years and under. Most sites would probably be able to mirror themselves on a .kids domain with little to no extra effort. Most corporations, schools, and other organizations have perfectly harmless material that kids and teens can view without causing their parents to stay up at night.”


  • Posted: 07/13/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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YouTube Channel Launched in War on Illegal Pornography

House votes to block Net porn on government PCs

    CNet News: “The measure, which arrived in the form of an 111-page amendment sponsored by House Appropriations Chairman David Obey, a Wisconsin Democrat, says on the second-to-last page: ‘None of the funds made available in this act may be used to maintain or establish a computer network unless such network blocks the viewing, downloading, and exchanging of pornography.’ . . .  Patrick Trueman, the former chief of the Justice Department’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section who now does legal work for the conservative Alliance Defense Fund, says the government can easily say that while working on a federal contract, there can be no porn surfing–or even card-playing–because taxpayers have a “right to get their money’s worth from contractors.”


  • Posted: 07/09/2010
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  • Category: ADF in the News
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  • Source: news.cnet.com

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Google Says China Renews Its Internet License

US program to detect cyberattacks on companies, agencies

    AFP: “The United States is launching a program to detect cyberattacks on private US companies and government agencies running critical infrastructure such as the electricity grid and nuclear power plants, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday. … A US military official told the newspaper the program was ‘long overdue’ and would not constitute a violation of privacy.”


  • Posted: 07/08/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.google.com

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Capitol Hill briefing assesses far-reaching consequences of pornography

Russia’s impending internet crackdown

TSA withdraws “controversial opinion” restriction on web use

TSA to block “controversial opinion” on the web

    CBS: “The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is blocking certain websites from the federal agency’s computers, including halting access by staffers to any Internet pages that contain a ‘controversial opinion,’ according to an internal email obtained by CBS News.”


  • Posted: 07/06/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.cbsnews.com

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Coming to the internet: Triple-x domain for pornography

    The New American: “Patrick Trueman, who at one time headed up the child exploitation and obscenity section of the U.S. Department of Justice, noted that the addition of the .xxx domain franchise will more deeply entrench the problem of Internet pornography, giving pornographers another option for marketing their evil wares. ‘The .com domain is a cash cow for pornographers and they are not leaving it,’ Trueman said. ‘ICANN has no enforcement powers to make them leave and thus clean up .com. Pornographers would simply expand to .xxx and maintain their current .com sites, perhaps doubling the number of porn sites and doubling their menace to society.’”


  • Posted: 07/06/2010
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  • Category: Uncategorized
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  • Source: www.thenewamerican.com

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Will the .xxx suffix be available for adult web sites soon?

    FindLaw / Technologist: “Press reports indicate that ICM has received 110,000 pre-reservations for sites seeking to implement the .xxx designation. Use of the .xxx designation would be voluntary, not mandatory, for adult Web sites, and each such domain name would cost about $60. … If a good number of adult Web sites adopt the .xxx suffix, it could potentially become one of the most common top-level domains, perhaps someday even rivaling .com.”


  • Posted: 07/02/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: blogs.findlaw.com

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Hustler, Paris Hilton sex site see .xxx porn ghetto

    BusinessWeek: “‘.xxx would basically be an avenue for authorities to try and push all adult websites into a certain segment and then get rid of .com,’ Michael Klein, the president of Hustler, the brand behind websites like Barelylegal.com, said from his Los Angeles office. An unlikely alliance has formed in opposition to Lawley. Adult content providers see lost revenue from software blocks, increased stigmatization and possible censorship, while conservative groups such as the Family Research Council argue .xxx legitimizes porn.”


  • Posted: 07/02/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.businessweek.com

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Google won’t censor in China, exec says

NYPD removes child porn video from servers

NARAL wants pregnancy centers removed from internet directories

FL: Chaplain link on fire district’s website must include disclaimer

Google says China partially blocks search service

Google faces pressure as China to decide on license

PA House passes teen sexting bill

Senators debate terms of cybersecurity overhaul

    The Hill: “A debate is emerging in the Senate over key aspects of recently introduced cybersecurity legislation, including which agency should be in charge of protecting the country’s civilian networks and how much authority the president should have in the event of a cyberattack.”


  • Posted: 06/30/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: thehill.com

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.xxx porn red-light district domain is one step closer

Google changes China access after Beijing objects

InternetSafety.com says new .xxx domain will create twice the porn

    PR Newswire: “Under the ICANN guidelines, sites with adult content are not required to purchase a domain ending in .xxx or to abandon their existing .com addresses. Therefore, existing adult sites will be able to purchase .xxx versions of their domains and simply use the new address to point traffic to their existing .com site, effectively doubling their presence on the Internet.”


  • Posted: 06/28/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.prnewswire.com

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CWA objects to pornography industry getting .xxx domain

    Christian NewsWire: “CWA objects to ICANN giving so-called ‘adult entertainment’ respectability in the Internet world. … Penny Young Nance, CEO of Concerned Women for America (CWA) said, ‘Since the new .xxx domain is voluntary, it will not isolate all pornography in one area, but it will cause parents and others to think that the Internet is safe for children. Worse, it continues to ease the seepage of pornography into the popular culture, making it an acceptable aspect of daily life. Any initiative that mainstreams pornography is harmful to children and society.’”


  • Posted: 06/28/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.christiannewswire.com

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“Porn’s new domain is good news”

    Lance Ulanoff writing at PCMag.com: “Some conservative leaders have been quoted arguing that a porn-only domain would only serve to validate the porn industry. In other words, this multi-billion dollar business with thousands of employees, print services, video production operations and its own trade show is not already ‘validated as an actual business’. This has to be the silliest argument I’ve ever heard. The constitution of an official TLD for adult material will have no more impact on the validation of the porn industry than a teenage boy picking up his first Playboy.”


  • Posted: 06/28/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.pcmag.com

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When it comes to online smut, privacy matters; when it comes to political speech, it doesn’t, says U.S. Supreme Court

    ChristianNewsWire: “Robert Peters, president of Morality in Media, had the following comments: … ‘In June 2004, the Supreme Court affirmed a lower federal court decision which had upheld a preliminary injunction blocking enforcement of the Child Online Protection Act, a law that would have required websites that commercially distribute pornography to take reasonable steps to keep kids away from the smut. In so doing, the Supreme Court agreed with the trial court’s finding that “blocking or filtering technology may be at least as successful as COPA would be in restricting minors’ access to harmful material online without imposing the burden on constitutionally protected speech that COPA imposes on adult users…” Specifically, the trial court found (in the words of the appellate court) that requiring adults to ‘identify themselves as a precondition to accessing disfavored speech’ would ‘likely…deter many adults from accessing that speech.”‘”


  • Posted: 06/28/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.christiannewswire.com

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11th Circuit: Live porn website illegally “operates as a business” in residential area

    FlavaWorks, Inc., v. City of Miami, No. 09-11264 (11th Cir. June 25, 2010) | Excerpt: “The activities taking place at the 27th Street residence are part and parcel to Flava Work’s business operations. The fact that certain aspects of the business are performed at other locations does not alter this analysis. Business objectives are the sole reason individuals are paid to live and engage in sexual activities at the 27th Street residence. Flava Works would be unable to deliver content to its subscribers without these endeavors. The activities taking place at the 27th Street residence are a clear violation of the prohibition against operating a business in a residential zone.”


  • Posted: 06/25/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous

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Pedophiles find a home on Wikipedia

.xxx domain won’t clean up the web

Porn domain .xxx gets initial approval

Pakistan scours Google, other sites for blasphemy

Internet addresses to accept Chinese script

Porn sites closer to .xxx Web address

OpenDNS FamilyShield makes it easier to block porn from your kids’ computers

Apple and Microsoft chart a porn-free future for smartphones

    National Catholic Register: “When Apple CEO Steve Jobs proclaimed that Apple products like the iPhone and iPad would provide ‘freedom from porn,’ the man regarded as the most savvy tech visionary of the last 30 years was suddenly derided as a ‘puritan’ and a ‘censor.’ … [Microsoft's] guidelines specifically state what won’t be allowed: ‘Images that are sexually suggestive or provocative, content that generally falls under the category of pornography, or content that a reasonable person would consider to be adult or borderline adult content.’”


  • Posted: 06/23/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: www.ncregister.com

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Why are pro-family organizations restricting their audience reach?

    On a daily basis, we receive email alerts from numerous pro-family organizations. Many of these emails contain excellent information. Unfortunately, many of them also fail to provide a web link to the contents of the email. Web links are invaluable to bloggers, reporters, researchers, and others who would like to cite or further report on the material in question. Please include web links to the content in your emails.


  • Posted: 06/17/2010
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  • Category: ADF in the News

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FCC set to reconsider broadband regulations

New Bill Gives Obama ‘Kill Switch’ To Shut Down The Internet

First, China. Next: the Great Firewall of… Australia?

Capitol Hill briefing on pornography reveals brutal, addictive nature of today’s internet porn

Have the Feds gone soft on porn?

    (Warning graphic images, descriptions, and language)

    Stephanie Mencimer writing at Mother Jones: “On Tuesday, a group of anti-porn activists and scholars arrived on Capitol Hill to brief members of Congress and their staffs and to call for beefed-up federal enforcement of obscenity laws. . . . Christian-right groups have been complaining about porn forever, of course, and Trueman, a lawyer with the anti-gay Alliance Defense Fund, falls within that camp. But technology has made the right’s argument far more compelling, as the Internet has brought pornography to a far bigger and more vulnerable audience than ever before. . . . [A]ccording to Trueman, much of the explicit material found on the Internet these days isn’t protected speech but obscenity, which is prosecutable.”


  • Posted: 06/16/2010
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  • Category: ADF in the News

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Christian colleges flourish in distance learning environment

Chinese crack down on sexual “licentiousness”

“Shady” porn site practices put visitors at risk

NY attorney general warns teen social networking website

55 Chinese websites asked to delete porn content

FRC Launches State Legislative Tracking Website

Political parties lose control as Internet aids challengers

China government defends Internet censorship laws

Windows Phone 7 Marketplace to be porn-free zone