Pakistani Christian brick kiln workers unpaid at Christmas

Gallup: Four in 10 Americans believe in strict Creationism

Australia: “Religious charities putting doctrine above children’s interests”

Indian Muslim traders welcome sharia-compliant share index

Symposium: “Religious Diversity in the European Workplace”

Marriage: Merely a Social Construct?

MI: “Transgender” man denied marriage license in Oakland County

The ACLU goes after public prayer

Idaho Press-Tribune: Let’s get resolution on NCA Bible suit

TIME profiles Virginia AG Ken Cuccinelli, “man on a mission”

    TIME: “Since taking office in January, Virginia’s new attorney general has sued the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over its plan to regulate greenhouse gases, opined that Virginia can regulate first-trimester-abortion facilities as it can hospitals, advised that the state’s public colleges lack authority to bar discrimination against gays and lesbians, tweaked the state seal to cover the bare breast of the Roman goddess Virtus and subpoenaed the University of Virginia to probe for evidence that a former professor manipulated climate-science research.”

    Via Joseph Lawler at The American Spectator: “It’s a sign of the disconnect between what Democrats on Capitol Hill think they can do to the public at large, and what the public thinks they should be allowed to do.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Bench & Bar

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Brad O’Leary: Scrapping school religious holidays solves nothing

    Brad O’Leary writing at Townhall: “Nowhere in our Constitution is there a mandate for a centralized public education system to begin with . . . Nor did our Founders establish a school system whereby American families are taxed into oblivion and essentially forced to enroll their children in government schools . . . Schools, incidentally, where students are told to check their religion at the door under some bizarre interpretation of the First Amendment.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty
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  • Source: townhall.com

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More than 25% of US kids taking prescription drugs regularly

Via FIRE, legal scholarship on free speech at universities

US public schools are going broke, yet some spend like a kid in a candy store

WSJ: Jersey’s judge grudge

European Parliament backing for hard pressed Christians in Iraq

Suspicious death ignites fury in China

Pennsylvania Supreme Court reviews abortion rules

Cincinnati pediatricians protest abortion doctor neighbor

Kansas Dems call appointments “resurrection” of Kline

Utah: Advocates of homosexual behavior press for sexual orientation ordinance in Ogden

NC: Selection of “gay” leader no step toward Christian unity

Orthodox Rabbi predicts deadly fallout from permitting homosexuality in military

    LifeSiteNews: “In an interview with LifeSiteNews.com, noted Orthodox Rabbi Yehuda Levin has predicted the U.S. military will pay with ‘loss of life and limb’ for the normalization of homosexual acts. This past weekend the U.S. Senate voted to repeal the 1993 law that forbids open homosexuals from serving in the U.S. military. President Obama signed the repeal into law today.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family
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  • Source: www.lifesitenews.com

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Indiana GOP leaders propose right-to-work bills

Military watchdog: Catholic Church silent at wrong time

Montana: Abortion bills to heat up 2011 Legislature

WSJ: Death panels revisited

    Wall Street Journal editorial: “Under highly centralized national health care, the government inevitably makes cost-minded judgments about what types of care are ‘best’ for society at large, and the standardized treatments it prescribes inevitably steal life-saving options from individual patients . . . Democrats and the press corps accused Mrs. Palin of misrepresentation to avoid reckoning with this inexorable rationing reality that President Obama has himself implicitly acknowledged.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life
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  • Source: online.wsj.com

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Nebraska bill bans telemed abortions using RU 486 drug

Texas pro-life group backs Paxton over Straus for Speaker

Rasmussen: 19% get regular news updates via phone or other devices

Terrain shifts in challenges to the health care law

Askins, two judges advance in Oklahoma Supreme Court selection process

UK: “Multi-faith chaplains to make House of Commons more inclusive”

Police: Nigeria radical Muslim sect wounds 3

China to cut crucial rare earths export quotas

Iran struggles to redefine its religious leaders’ roles

Egypt weighs easing rules on building new churches

Jonah Goldberg: “As gay becomes bourgeois”

Ken Blackwell: Tie debt ceiling vote to balanced budget amendment

    Ken Blackwell writing at Townhall: “Next spring, Republicans will be faced with a serious decision over whether to vote to raise the debt ceiling . . . In all likelihood, Republicans will have to reluctantly vote to extend the debt ceiling — but they should not do so without extracting some serious concessions in return . . . Republicans should agree to raise the debt ceiling only if Democrats also agree to vote for a balanced budget amendment resolution.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: townhall.com

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Five arrested over Danish cartoon terror plot

University of Virginia reforms speech code

Heritage Foundation: Obama will make you pay more at the pump

    Heritage Foundation / The Foundry: “Now this week, analysts including former president of Shell Oil, John Hofmeister, say Americans could be paying $5/gallon of gasoline by 2012. Investment banks are predicting a return to $100/barrel oil, and OPEC is refusing to raise production. All of this news would be less frightening if the White House were focusing on potential ways to lower energy prices. Instead, President Obama is admittedly fixated with raising them.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Miscellaneous
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  • Source: blog.heritage.org

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Rand Paul: Attach spending cuts to every “major” piece of legislation

White House to push global warming policy, GOP vows fight

111th Congress added more debt than first 100 Congresses combined: $10,429 per person in U.S.

Pennsylvania parental consent abortion law gets legal aid

“North Carolina ruling jeopardizes same-sex families”

Vander Plaats raising money to ‘remove remaining four justices’

Vander Plaats: Iowa Chief Justice should outline plan for remaining justices to resign

Alan E. Sears: Morality and the Military

Law Review: Burning Crosses on Campus

    Burning Crosses on Campus: University Speech Codes
    Alexander Tsesis, 43 Conn. L. Rev. 617 (2010)

    “This Article adds a fresh perspective to this decades-old academic tempest of intellectual disagreement about First Amendment theory. It first discusses the current problem of hate speech on college campuses. It then turns to a survey of First Amendment jurisprudence that is relevant to the regulation of hate speech on campus. Then it compares and contrasts international approaches to that of the United States. The final portion of the Article analyzes the narrow and broad implications of the Supreme Court’s rational in Virginia v. Black to develop two forms of college hate speech regulations that are likely to withstand First Amendment challenges.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Religious Liberty

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Law Review: Understanding the First Amendment’s (Non)Response to the Negative Effects of Media on Children by Looking to the Example of Violent Video Games

    From Research Conclusions to Real Change: Understanding the First Amendment’s (Non)Response to the Negative Effects of Media on Children by Looking to the Example of Violent Video Games
    Renee Newman Knake, 63 SMU L. Rev. 1197 (2010)

    “Woodhouse’s proposal offers an appealing perspective for those who support regulation of children’s access to harmful media. The real issue, however, is whether ecogenerism will evolve from academic theory to actual practice. This article tests her theory by revisiting the line of violent video game cases to evaluate whether her ecogenerist perspective can achieve any real change in the courts’ decisions. Particular attention is devoted to challenges presented by First Amendment free speech protections with a primary focus on the Ninth Circuit’s decision in Schwarzenegger to invalidate a California statute prohibiting the sale or rental of violent video games to minors, a case that the Supreme Court is poised to soon decide. While some speculate that the Supreme Court is unlikely to reverse the Ninth Circuit’s decision given the uniform position of other courts on this issue, this article reveals that an ecogenerist perspective demands a reversal by the Court precisely for that reason. Should the Court affirm the Ninth Circuit’s invalidation of the statute, the article concludes by proposing recommendations for future research and regulatory efforts from an ecogenerist perspective.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Marriage & Family

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Law Review: Is There a Right to Have Children? Substantive Due Process and Probation Conditions That Restrict Reproductive Rights

    Is There a Right to Have Children? Substantive Due Process and Probation Conditions That Restrict Reproductive Rights
    Joanna Nairn, 6 Stan. J. Civ. Rts. & Civ. Liberties 1 (2010)

    “This Article focuses on women who have been sentenced, as part of their probation, either to use specific forms of birth control or simply to avoid procreating. It begins by exploring the prevalence of these conditions, hampered by the difficulty in gathering data about probation conditions that are not appealed to higher courts. Using a combination of appellate opinions and reported trial court decisions, it notes that appellate courts have begun to break with the unanimous rejection of such conditions that characterized the first few decades of their reported use. Moreover, it highlights a pattern of appellate decisions that focus not on the constitutionality of these conditions but rather on their reasonableness in the particular case–a trend that has created inconsistency across courts. It then goes on to survey the Court’s substantive due process jurisprudence, noting the specificity with which the Court has defined protected rights and describing the three methods by which it deems rights fundamental. This Article also argues that it is likely that strict scrutiny would apply to probation conditions that restrict reproductive rights. Finally, it makes the case for invalidating such conditions under a strict scrutiny framework, arguing that the right implicated is fundamental and that there are less restrictive alternatives available.”


  • Posted: 12/29/2010
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  • Category: Sanctity of Life

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