Legal Periodical: Acculturation Through the Middle Ages: The Islamic Law of Nations and its Place in the History of International Law

Allain, Jean, Acculturation Through the Middle Ages: The Islamic Law of Nations and its Place in the History of International Law (October 10, 2011). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1941775

As part of a Research Handbook, what this chapter seeks to achieve is to draw attention to an important phenomena which transpired during millennium between Antiquity and the Age of Discovery, that is: the creation and sustained existence of a self-encompassing, system of international law meant to govern relations of the Islamic world and its ‘other’. The chapter demonstrates that the Islamic law of nations took from its predecessors and, through acculturation, gave to those who came after it, so that the echoes of the Siyar, the Islamic law of nations, are to be recognised as having been heard in the development of the Christian law of nations continuing through to contemporary international law. What clearly emerges from this study is that much research needs to be undertaken to understand the Islamic law of nations which played out during the Middle Ages and its contemporary relevance both historically and normatively.